Tag Archives: YouTube video

Tech Thoughts Net News – Wednesday Edition – May 20, 2015

Nearly 1/3 people use Facebook while driving;  How to get started with Linux: A beginner’s guide;  Majority of Americans “concerned” about NSA domestic surveillance;  In defense of ad-blockers, a vital tool for the privacy conscious;  How to back up and store photos when traveling;  Facebook Messenger video calling now rolling out to all;  Facebook Messenger platform’s next target: games;  13 apps for bettering your mental health;  Five Android-only apps worth a look;  Easily secure your web browsing with TunnelBear’s free Chrome extension;  Screenshots: A preview of Microsoft Windows 10;  Google reprimanded for YouTube Kids app showing inappropriate content;  How to upgrade graphics in a laptop;  Employees choose adult content, app downloads over security;  Process Hacker Portable (free).

Tech Thoughts Daily Tech News 2

Nearly 1/3 people use Facebook while driving – AT&T commissioned Braun Research poll finds nearly 1 out of every 3 people use Facebook while driving. Driving their automobile. On the road, in the United States, where you live. The study was done by poll, asking 2,067 in the United States aged between 16-65 who use their smartphone at least once a day AND drive at least once a day a number of questions. The least mind-blowing statistic in this study suggests that 62% of all drivers in the United States keep their smartphone within easy reach while driving. This means “in their hand, lap, or cup holder, or on the passenger seat or dash.” The rest is just nuts.

EFF’s Secure Messaging Scoreboard empowers developers and educates users – Most messaging apps are advertised as secure. The Electronic Frontier Foundation decided to verify those claims and then put its findings in a scoreboard. See which apps pass with flying colors.

In defense of ad-blockers, a vital tool for the privacy conscious – Look up. And then to the left and right. And somewhere in-between these words. You’ll see ads scattered all over the place, asking you to “buy this” or “click me,” or — if you’re really lucky — you’ll get one that takes over the entire page. Or you won’t. Millions instead opt to use an ad-blocker, a browser plugin that effectively scrubs every webpage from flashy, garish, and memory-consuming ads.

How to back up and store photos when traveling – Don’t lose your precious photo memories to a misplaced bag or stolen camera. Backing up your photos may seem daunting — especially on vacation — but it’s actually quite simple once you get started. Remember, the point of any backup solution is to ensure that you have multiple copies of your photos in different locations. Just having photos stored on an external hard drive and nowhere else does not make for a reliable backup.

Facebook Messenger video calling now rolling out to all – It’s time to freshen up, comb that hair, exercise that jaw, and maybe bring out the dictionary or translation guide. Facebook Messenger’s new video calling feature, which was announced barely a month ago, is now starting to roll out everywhere and on every platform. Messenger is shaping up to be one distinct and, more importantly, distinguishable product apart from Facebook’s main app, giving users the convenience of expressing themselves better, more immediately, and perhaps more creatively than they could with text, emoji, stickers, or even memes.

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How to easily secure your web browsing with TunnelBear’s free Chrome extension – Only need VPN-like protection for your browser and not your whole desktop? Check out TunnelBear for Chrome and Chrome OS. We’ve talked about the importance of virtual private networks before. They’re a great tool for protecting your browsing on an open Wi-Fi network or defeating regional restrictions when you need to.

Five Android-only apps worth a look – The mobile ecosystem is filled with wonderful apps that can do nearly anything you need. For the most part, these apps can be found across platforms. But a handful of important apps can be found on just one platform or the other. I wanted to highlight some of the high-quality apps you will find on only Android.

How to get started with Linux: A beginner’s guide – The world of Linux is ready to welcome you, with a shower of free open-source software you can use on any PC: hundreds of active Linux distributions, and dozens of different desktop environments you could run on them. Everything from software installation to hardware drivers works differently on Linux, though, which can be daunting. Take heart—you don’t even need to install Linux on your PC to get started. Here’s everything you need to know.

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Fedora Linux with the Gnome Shell desktop.

Screenshots: A preview of Microsoft Windows 10 – Windows 10 is coming and you’d better be prepared for it. Here are a few screenshots to get you started.

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Microsoft will charge for Windows 10 upgrades after one-year freebie offer lapses – It’s official: If you want to upgrade to Windows 10 without spending a dime, you’ll want to do so in the first year after it launches. Afterwards, it’ll cost money.

How to upgrade graphics in a laptop – Pssst—there’s a secret that few in the PC gaming community know: You actually can upgrade your big-fat gaming laptop’s graphics. But even the few who know it’s possible, believe it to not be worth the time and effort. After all, who wants to scour some obscure forum to find out whether blowing a wad of cash on a GPU from eBay will work? And then there’s the inherent risk of having the used GPU blow up after a month of use. Enter Eurocom, a Canadian laptop vendor that in February began offering one-stop-shop upgrade kits for consumers who want to take the risk of performing the equivalent of open-heart surgery on a laptop.

13 apps for bettering your mental health – May is Mental Health Month, a time to bring more attention to the subject, shed the stigma, and give people the care they deserve. Here are 12 apps trying to do just that.

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MY3 helps you stay connected when you are having thoughts of suicide.

Free music streaming service MixRadio launches on Android and iOS – Previously available exclusively on Windows Phone, MixRadio today announced its launch on Android and iOS. The company says that it is bringing “the world’s easiest and most personal music streaming experience” to these new platforms. And as part of that expansion, MixRadio is also teaming up with HTC to exclusively provide music updates for BlinkFeed on the manufacturer’s Android handsets.

Microsoft rolls out touch-first Office apps preview for Android phones – Microsoft is making available for Android phones public previews of its promised standalone touch versions of Word, Excel and PowerPoint. The new Office for Android phone preview apps are similar to the touch-first Office apps preview for Windows phones that Microsoft made available to testers last week.

Inkscape: Open-source Illustrator sneaks up – While the bug fixes and performance improvements are welcome news in and of themselves, there are plenty of brand new features in this release. There’s a new Measurements tool that will live update the length of objects and angles as you move the mouse over them. The Text tool has also been significantly improved. The Text tool now defaults to points (pt) though you can change that to pixels, centimetres, inches and others, including the web-centric em. Even better, the em support actually works in this release, which should be a boon for anyone working with graphics destined for responsive websites. This release also features support for font faces beyond bold/italic and improved support for file formats created by other apps. Inkscape now works pretty well with Corel DRAW, EMF, and WMF files and even has support for Microsoft Visio diagrams.

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Creating illustrations in Inkscape .91

Apple Pay troubleshooting tips and tricks – Apple Pay is one of the newest, most secure payment methods on the block, but sometimes it just doesn’t work with every retailer every time. Here are some tips on how to troubleshoot Apple Pay.

Security:

HTTPS-crippling attack threatens tens of thousands of Web and mail servers – The vulnerability affects an estimated 8.4 percent of the top one million websites and a slightly bigger percentage of mail servers populating the IPv4 address space, the researchers said. The threat stems from a flaw in the transport layer security protocol that websites and mail servers use to establish encrypted connections with end-users. The new attack, which its creators have dubbed Logjam, can be exploited against a subset of servers that support the widely used Diffie-Hellman key exchange, which allows two parties that have never met before to negotiate a secret key even though they’re communicating over an unsecured, public channel.

DDoS attacks are getting worse, as attackers shift tactics and targets – Attackers that harness the power of thousands or millions of devices to flood networks with data are shifting tactics to pack a smaller, but much longer-lasting punch. How these attacks are carried out has also changed. Attackers are increasingly exploiting Simple Service Discovery Protocol (SSDP), a common protocol in most modern networked devices — including routers media servers, webcams, and games consoles. With widely available tools, they can seek out misconfigured and unsecured devices connected to the internet to launch larger, coordinated attacks against their targets. Not only that, the target of these attacks has shifted. Little by little, malicious actors are shifting away from financial gain and making it a far more personal mission.

Enterprise employees choose adult content, app downloads over security – The majority of 1580 survey respondents worldwide said they understood the cybersecurity risks linked to downloading email attachments from unknown senders, viewing adult content, using social media and downloading unapproved applications, but this has not curbed their risk-taking when using corporate systems and mobile gadgets. Across 11 countries, business employees admitted to accessing adult websites at work — a veritable breeding ground of malware and malicious content. A new report from Juniper Networks suggests that data breaches will cost the global economy up to $2 TRILLION by 2019, with the US the most heavy-hit.

Company News:

PayPal ordered to pay $25 million over deceptive practices – PayPal, used by online merchants and shoppers to send and process payments, has just settled a federal lawsuit from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) over alleged deceptive practices in its “Bill Me Later” program which is now known as PayPal Credit. PayPal will be returning $15 million to customers who lost money due to PayPal’s practices, and a $10 million fine has been levied against PayPal, going towards the CFPB. After the settlement, PayPal will be required to correct its consumer disclosure policies, making them “clearly and prominently” displayed to consumers.

Google reprimanded for YouTube Kids app showing inappropriate content – Google’s recent mobile app, YouTube Kids, a version of the popular video service that curates safe content for young children, has come under fire from two child and consumer advocacy groups claiming that the app is deceiving. The Center for Digital Democracy and the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood filed a complaint with the FTC, stating that “the app is rife with videos that would not meet anyone’s definition of ‘family friendly.'” The complaint included evidence of video clips that had been found on YouTube Kids that were described as disturbing and/or harmful to young children.

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Pandora buys music data cruncher Next Big Sound – By taking over a company that figures out the best tactics for music online, the biggest Internet radio service hopes to convince more labels and artists — oh, and advertisers — to join up.

Uber tests taking 30% commission from new drivers – The ride-hailing service is testing a new, tiered fee structure that could cut into part-time drivers’ pay but reward full-time drivers.

Uber threatens legal action against Australian tax office – After last month calling for regulation in Australia to allow it to operate legally, Uber is now considering using legal means to challenge a tax office ruling that requires its drivers to pay GST in line with taxi operators. Earlier today, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) classified Uber as a taxi service, and consequently its 9000 Australian drivers have until August 1 to get an Australian Business Number and register for GST. Uber disagreed with the decision and said its drivers, who typically earn $30,000 a year, should not pay tax on their first dollar earned as it hit out at the ATO.

Games and Entertainment:

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt (PC) review impressions: Smoothly slaying monsters – After months of excitement about The Witcher 3, it seemed like it was falling apart in the run-up to launch. All of the reviews that went up last week were conducted on debug PS4 consoles. PC codes, meanwhile, were pushed back time and time again until finally I was told we’d receive code on launch day, probably. And all this from a PC-friendly developer like CD Projekt. When a game’s coming in that hot on PC, we’re right to be worried. Mortal Kombat X, Assassin’s Creed Unity—these are just two recent examples where the PC version came at the last minute and featured huge problems not caught on consoles. So yeah, I was worried about The Witcher 3. For no reason, it turns out.

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Facebook Messenger platform’s next target: games – We should have seen this coming a mile away. After all, it seems to be the trend with popular instant messengers these days anyway. Facebook is said to be now eying adding the power of games to its Messenger service, leveraging the nascent platform announced barely two months ago. But while the move may sound like a no-brainer in retrospect, Facebook’s motivations might be somewhat different, driven instead by reports that its Messenger Platform as a whole is starting to become a slow-moving flop.

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Against all odds, the new Wolfenstein games are fantastic – Wolfenstein: The New Order is as brutal and intense as any first-person shooter you’ll ever play, and it’s the most recent entry in a classic series whose stock has considerably fallen. But developer MachineGames used smart storytelling devices to build up a truly evil enemy that you feel no guilt at all in taking on — the game is set in an alternate history where the Nazis won — and the results are surprisingly congruous and emotional.

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Unreleased footage of cancelled Doom 4 shows why they restarted – By now you’ve probably heard all about that new Doom teaser that was released yesterday as a build-up to Bethesda’s full unveiling at E3 next month. But did you know that developers id Software completely restarted the project back in late 2011? Prior to that, they had gotten pretty far on what they were then calling Doom 4, but eventually realized it just didn’t have the “soul” of a Doom game, and needed to be scrapped. A brief, unreleased video of that old version has surfaced today, and it’s pretty clear they made the right call.

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Popcorn Time gains an in-browser viewing option – Popcorn Time, the so-called “Netflix of piracy”, went from a computer application to a mobile app, and now a new website is offering it as an in-browser option — meaning users are now able to watch pirated movies inside their web browser, perhaps proving the most simple version of the app to become available. The upside to this (for the pirates out there, at least) is that there’s no actual download or installation needed — one just browses, clicks a title, and it starts playing. The movie industry shudders.

Off Topic (Sort of):

Virtual reality could be the most important gimmick ever based on a brain flaw – Researchers working on ways to design computers that operate more like the human brain than like a really, really, really smart drugstore calculator might want to think twice considering some of the things virtual reality is revealing about how human brains actually work – and how they don’t.

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Appeals court says anti-Muslim YouTube video doesn’t have to come down – A Los Angeles actress had demanded the video’s removal after claiming she was fired from her job and received death threats over her brief stint in the video. Cindy Garcia said she thought she would be in an adventure show but was tricked into performing in a “hateful anti-Islamic production” that sparked worldwide protests. A three-judge panel of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the woman last year in a 2-1 vote and ordered Google to remove the video. The court ruled that she controlled the copyright of her five-second stint, in which her dubbed voice asks: “Is your Muhammad a child molester?” Google, the media, and digital rights groups asked the court to rehear the case en banc with 11 judges. The media argued that the original decision “expands the concept of copyright ownership.” The larger panel of the San Francisco-based appeals court agreed Monday in a 10-1 ruling.

LG creates stick-on OLED TV screen less than 1mm thick – LG Display just unveiled a new, ultra-thin television screen that is less than one millimeter thick, at an industry event in its home country, Korea. LG’s current thinnest TV screen is a 55-inch OLED panel that is 4.3 mm thick. So, four of these new screens stacked together are still thinner than LG’s thinnest screen on the market. This new display won’t be available in stores anytime soon. The design revealed in Seoul is a proof-of-concept showing that the technology is possible even though production costs may not be low enough to be practical, yet.

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FTC sues four cancer charities over $187 million scam – The Federal Trade Commission has accused four cancer charities of defrauding well-meaning donors for over $187 million. Today, the FTC and law enforcement groups from all 50 states have filed a complaint against the Cancer Fund of America, Cancer Support Services, Children’s Cancer Fund of America, and the Breast Cancer Society. The complaint alleges that these four “sham charities” solicited millions in donations by promising to help pay for hospice care, chemotherapy, and other services for cancer patients. But only a fraction of that money actually went to patients. The rest went to company cars, high salaries, and even a Caribbean cruise.

It’s raining spiders in Australia again – Australia’s Southern Tablelands are experiencing an Angel Hair event – a spider migration which covers entire towns in spiderwebs. Thousands of flying spiders falling from the sky, creating an ethereal, other-worldly event the likes of which you’ve only likely ever seen in a dream. Or a nightmare – depending on your preferences. “When I looked up at the sun it was like this tunnel of webs going up for a couple of hundred meters into the sky,” said Goulburn resident Ian Watson. “It was beautiful.”

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KFC had a food tray that was also a Bluetooth keyboard – Whoever said that fast food does nothing good for you should get ready to eat their words. And some KFC too. The German division of the food chain has unveiling a solution to the problem of typing on your smartphone or tablet with greasy fingers: a thin, flexible Bluetooth keyboard that comes on the tray under your food order. It’s called the KFC Tray Typer, and before you rush out to your nearest fried chicken fast food outlet, know that this has only been shown in Germany, and you can’t really get your hands — greasy or not — on one. Read on for the explanation.

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9 programming languages and the women who created them – From the dawn of mainframes through today, women have designed and developed programming languages that have had significant, lasting impact on software development.

Something to think about:

“In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.”

–      Margaret Atwood

Today’s Free Downloads:

Process Hacker Portable – Process Hacker is a feature-packed tool for manipulating processes and services on your computer.

Process Hacker is an application which helps users to view and manage the processes and their threads, modules and memory from their computers.

Installer version available.

Features:

A simple, customizable tree view with highlighting showing you the processes running on your computer.

Detailed performance graphs.

A complete list of services and full control over them (start, stop, pause, resume and delete).

A list of network connections.

Comprehensive information for all processes: full process performance history, thread listing and stacks with dbghelp symbols, token information, module and mapped file information, virtual memory map, environment variables, handles, …

Full control over all processes1, even processes protected by rootkits or security software. Its kernel-mode driver has unique abilities which allows it to terminate, suspend and resume all processes and threads, including software like IceSword, avast! anti-virus, AVG Antivirus, COMODO Internet Security, etc. (just to name a few).

Find hidden processes and terminate them. Process Hacker detects processes hidden by simple rootkits such as Hacker Defender and FU.

Easy DLL injection and unloading2 – simply right-click a process and select “Inject DLL” to inject and right-click a module and select “Unload” to unload!

Many more features…

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Secret Disk – Secret Disk can create additional disk on your PC, which can be invisible and locked with a password within one second. You can make your private files and folders invisible and protected.

You don’t need to format your hard disk or make any changes to boot sector. Our program will create new disk automatically very quickly. You can make this disk invisible, including all contents, and protect it with a password. You can store any files and folders on the disk. Secret disk works as usual hard disk and compatible with any other programs which you have installed. You can have more than one secret disk and you can also choose disk letter.

In case of power outage or fatal error of OS Windows your secret disk will be locked and become invisible automatically. It happens automatically because information are stored in the virtual memory. Secret Disk does not encrypt any files, it just limits access to your files (you can use password). Software ties virtual disk to your files. This will provide you enough security to hide your files from any person.

Limitations: Free version limited to a single 5 GB database, no tech support and displays Pro upgrade nag screens.

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In Pursuit of Freedom – The Pushback Continues:

Majority of Americans “concerned” about NSA domestic surveillance – A new survey shows there is wide support across the political spectrum for ending the National Security Agency’s domestic surveillance programs.

The poll (PDF), commissioned by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), showed 84 percent of respondents believed the FBI and other law enforcement agencies should require a warrant to access phone and email records.

Parts of the Patriot Act will sunset this June. But the more egregious spying programs are under a different authority. Lawmakers say they only know a fraction of what they should.

Also, two-thirds of respondents believe the Patriot Act, which the NSA used to authorize the mass bulk collection of Americans’ phone records (which was later struck down by a court), should not be reauthorized in its current form.

Fewer than one-in-five respondents were “not concerned” that the US government was collecting and storing phone records, emails, bank statements, and other communications on them.

The poll is the latest to gather the opinions on Americans’ view of domestic surveillance. Since the Edward Snowden revelations landed almost two years ago, there has been an intense debate across the US about the role and scope of the US law enforcement and intelligence agencies, which have shown to have stored and accessed millions of Americans’ personal records and data.

Watch the ACLU and Tea Party’s New Anti-Patriot Act Ad – Just how bad is the Patriot Act? If you guessed “bad enough that the ACLU and Tea Party would join forces to make an ads about how bad it is bad,” then you’d be correct.

Below is “Collect Call,” a new TV spot from the ACLU and the Tea Party Patriots, reminding citizens that because of the Patriot Act, the government can watch you Skype with your favorite soldier, and also listen to your doctor tell you about the results of your latest medical test.

The Patriot Act expires on June 1, and if it dies, so will the NSA’s ability to spy on Americans. This is obviously the desired outcome for both the ACLU, which wants to preserve the civil rights of citizens, as well as the Tea Party apparently, who just generally don’t like the government meddling in their business. Which is why the two groups are airing the ad in Washington, DC, as well as in New Hampshire and Iowa.

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Tech sector tells Obama encryption backdoors “undermine human rights” – Technology giants like Apple, Google, and Microsoft urged President Barack Obama on Tuesday to refrain from supporting any US policy that would require the tech sector to install backdoors into their products so the authorities can access encrypted data.

In a letter (PDF) to Obama, dozens of tech companies, cryptologists, and rights groups said mandatory backdoors—which many authorities in the US government and abroad have been calling for—would weaken cybersecurity as well as “undermine human rights.”

More than undermining every American’s cybersecurity and the nation’s economic security, introducing new vulnerabilities to weaken encrypted products in the US would also undermine human rights and information security around the globe. If American companies maintain the ability to unlock their customers’ data and devices on request, governments other than the United States will demand the same access, and will also be emboldened to demand the same capability from their native companies. The US government, having made the same demands, will have little room to object. The result will be an information environment riddled with vulnerabilities that could be exploited by even the most repressive or dangerous regimes. That’s not a future that the American people or the people of the world deserve.

Tuesday’s letter comes as the White House is in the process of coming up with a position on the issue and in response to a chorus of government officials at home and abroad—including British Prime Minister David Cameron, FBI Director James Comey, and former Attorney General Eric Holder—all calling for backdoors.

Pre-thoughtcrime: Russian think tank app catches protestors before they protest – Issac Asimov’s Harry Seldon used “psycho-history” to predict the future. Tom Cruise used “precogs” in Minority Report. And now a pro-Putin think tank is trying to divine dissident activity by mining social media.

The Center for Research in Legitimacy and Political Protest claims to have developed software that will search Russian social media posts for signs of plans by political opposition to the government to stage unapproved protests or meetings. Described by an Izvestia report as “a system to prevent mass disorder,” the software searches through social media posts once every five minutes to catch hints of “unauthorized actions” and potentially alert law enforcement to prevent them.

Public protests, rallies, marches, and meetings staged without government approval are outlawed in Russia—individuals can be fined up to about $600 (30,000 rubles) for participating in such events or sentenced to 50 hours of community service.

South Korea mandates spyware installation on teenagers’ smartphones – A law requiring the mass installation of spyware on teenagers’ smartphones suggests that the frightening level of population control exercised by its neighbours in “Best Korea” has rubbed off on the Republic’s administrators in Seoul.

The Republic of South Korea’s Communications Commission, a media regulator modeled after the United States’ FCC, now requires telecom companies and parents to ensure a monitoring app is installed whenever anyone under the age of 19 receives a new smartphone.

The measure will only slowly come into force over the next few years as it doesn’t require old smartphones be updated, although AP reports that most schools in South Korea sent out letters to parents encouraging them to install the software anyway.

“It is the same as installing a surveillance camera in teenagers’ smartphones,” Kim Kha Yeun told AP. Kim is a general counsel at Open Net Korea, a non-profit organization that is challenging the regulator’s ordinance to South Korea’s Constitutional Court.

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Filed under Free Software Downloads, Internet Security Alerts, Latest Tech News

Tech Thoughts Daily Net News – April 6, 2015

Facebook launches security primer;  How Facebook knows who your friends are;  How to stay safe online: CNET’s security checklist;  This Is How Drones Work;  The six best HDMI operating system sticks;  YouTube tips we bet you didn’t know;  The 100 Best Android Apps of 2015;  10 ways your Android phone is smarter than you;  How You Can Block Calls and Texts on Your Smartphone;  Here’s how Google Play scans your Android phone;  TrueCrypt Audit: No NSA Backdoors;  6 Makeup Apps for a Whole New You;  15 classic PC games you should play again;  App showdown: Roku vs. Chromecast vs. Apple TV vs. Fire TV vs. Nexus Player;  Dyre Wolf malware transfers victims to live operator; Three lies about Google Glass;  WinParrot (free).

Tech Thoughts Daily Tech News 2

Facebook launches primer detailing all things security – Anyone with a social networking account should be mindful not only of what they post on it, but also their security settings — misunderstanding a particular setting, for example, could lead to info you believed was private actually being visible to the public. Facebook has rolled out features that aim to improve the users’ awareness of those security features, including reminders that popup with snippets of information every now and again, and that settings review that rolled out not too long ago. Now it is back with more…a lot more.

How Facebook knows who your friends are, even better than you do – How does Facebook know who your friends are? It’s a mystery that has nagged users since at least 2011, when the Irish Data Protection Commissioner conducted a full-scale investigation into the issue. But four years later, there’s still a lot of confusion and misinformation about what Facebook’s doing when it “finds” your friends. Tracking your circle of friends is much easier than you think, once you answer the few basic questions Facebook asks when you sign up for an account.

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The six best HDMI operating system sticks – There’s a new kind of computer in town and it’s resides on an HDMI stick that’s not much bigger than a pack of gum.

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Fewer than 1% of Android devices affected by potentially harmful apps – Based on data collected by Google, less than one percent of Android devices had a potentially harmful application installed last year. This includes devices on which users have installed applications from outside the official Google Play store. The data was collected through a feature called Verify Apps that was first introduced in Android 4.2 back in 2012. The feature, which was also backported to Android 2.3 and higher in 2013, checks locally installed applications for potentially harmful behavior regardless of whether they were downloaded from Google Play or other sources. Verify Apps initially scanned applications only at installation time, but since March 2014 it also performs background scans, so it can later detect malicious applications that weren’t flagged when they were initially installed.

The 100 Best Android Apps of 2015 – Here in the PC Mag’s New York office, we haven’t seen much of the sun and it’s barely above freezing. But even if it’s still pretty miserable outside, that doesn’t mean you can’t spruce up your Android device with some great new apps! And have we got new apps. This list covers everything you need, from comic books, to finance, to secure messaging services.

10 ways your Android phone is smarter than you – You say you miss your dumbphone, but you really don’t, because your smartphone is, well…a hell of a lot smarter. It’s smarter than your dumbphone, and it’s also (sometimes) smarter than you. And it should be! It’s packed with sensors, a lifetime of Google knowledge, access to the whole Internet, and eerily accurate predictions based on your habits. Here are 10 ways your Android phone is too smart for its own good.

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YouTube tips we bet you didn’t know – It’s easy to spend hours watching YouTube videos about, well, pretty much anything. Using your mouse to adjust a setting isn’t exactly slow, but in some cases, the keyboard shortcuts are much faster. Here is a list of the best YouTube keyboard shortcuts you should start using right now. These shortcuts work when you open a new video, without needing to click anything in the player.

BlueDriver: Diagnose car problems with your smartphone or tablet – Got a ‘Check Engine’ light on your dash, staring at you? Wonder what it means? Wonder how much it will cost you to fix? Wondering if you can fix it yourself, if only you knew what it meant?

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6 Makeup Apps for a Whole New You – Spring makeovers are a perennial topic in the pages of magazines and on YouTube playlists. But unless you snag an appearance on Love, Lust or Run or hire a makeup artist, you’re pretty much on your own in Sephora or your local drugstore when it comes to figuring out what will make you look your best. That is unless you use a makeover app. Facial-recognition technology may be known for more serious uses, like spotting criminals and securing data, but a side benefit is that you can now achieve a sharp new eyeliner look with just a click. The results are often so realistic that selfies can essentially be faux-Photoshopped without your Instagram followers noticing a thing.

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How to get your Chromebook online from anywhere without killing your mobile data cap – Chromebooks were made to be online, even if Wi-Fi’s nowhere to be found. Here’s how to get online with a cellular signal without blowing through your data cap.

Carousel ‘Photo School’ may up your mobile photography game – The best camera you have is the one you’ve got with you, right? We bet your smartphone is on you most of the time, too, making it crucial for getting pics when you’re in a moment. While hardware and software are a big part of taking good pics, so is skill. If you don’t know how to take great photos, yours won’t be very good, regardless of what photo editor or smartphone you have. To help with that, Carousel is introducing Photo School, a series of blogs meant to encourage better smartphone photography.

How You Can Block Calls and Texts on Your Smartphone – No one enjoys cell phone spam, especially aggressive telemarketing calls and texts while you’re on the go. Though you can list your cell phone number on the Do Not Call Registry, that doesn’t stop telemarketing text messages or even all phone calls in our experience. If you’re tired of these nuisances, you have options. You can use the following apps and features built into your phone to help cut down on spam.

Microsoft Changing Default ‘Do Not Track’ Setting – Specifically, Redmond will no longer have the “Do Not Track” option enabled in Windows’ Express Settings, which you can click when you’re installing the operating system, in case you would prefer Microsoft make the decisions for you. Do Not Track is a little setting that you can enable in all of the major Web browsers. Presumably, advertisers are supposed to notice when a browser has the flag flipped on. If that’s the case, third-party advertisers should then exclude that browser from any kind of cross-site tracking. Though, the request is just that—a request that third-party services should follow.

Apple shows what its watch can do in new video tutorials – The company touts key features of its smartwatch in four short video clips released a week before presales start for the pricey device.

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Maximize your SSD’s lifespan with the right maintenance – SSDs differ significantly from the hard drives they’re replacing, including care and feeding. Follow these do’s and don’ts to keep your SSD in shipshape.

Security:

Ransomware alert: ‘Pacman’ scheme uses Dropbox link to gobble victims – All malware is bad, but ransomware is particularly insidious—ask any ransomware victim. That’s why a new attack scheme called “Pacman” has raised alarms, because it’s even nastier than usual. Think of the classic Pac-Man game’s voracious yellow ball, chomping up all of your files. It takes only one click to infect a vulnerable PC, and the attack gives victims only 24 hours to pay the ransom in Bitcoins or risk losing all of the compromised data. The current attack is particularly effective because it’s so convincing.

Here’s how Google Play scans your Android phone – Google has a system enacted through Google Play for Android devices called Verify Apps. Google’s latest Android Security State of the Union (for the year 2014) includes clarification on what the company is scanning on your phone – both inside Google Play-downloaded apps and in apps you’ve downloaded elsewhere. Verify Apps scans your phone’s apps for security risks in Google Play apps, and Safety Net provides protection for (and from) apps outside of Google Play. Yes, Google Play is scanning your phone – no, it’s not something to freak out about.

TrueCrypt Audit: No NSA Backdoors – A security audit of TrueCrypt has determined that the disk encryption software does not contain any backdoors that could be used by the NSA or other surveillance agencies. A report prepared by the NCC Group (PDF) for the Open Crypto Audit Project found that the encryption tool is not vulnerable to being compromised. However, the software was found to contain a few other security vulnerabilities, including one relating to the use of the Windows API to generate random numbers for master encryption key material. Despite this, TrueCrypt was given a relatively clean bill of health with none of the detected vulnerabilities considered severe enough to lead “to a complete bypass of confidentiality in common usage scenarios.”

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TrueCrypt running on my system. TrueCrypt is a very old friend. Good to see that it came through this with a “a relatively clean bill of health.”

Dyre Wolf malware transfers victims to live operator – IBM has detailed a new variation of the Dyre malware, which it is calling “The Dyre Wolf”. The malware targets large enterprises, and comes with an unexpected twist: a bit of social engineering involving a live operator posing as a representative. When on the phone with this operator, the hackers on the other side use banking information provided by the victim to initiate a large wire transfer…and in some cases use a DDoS attack to keep the company from discovering the transfer until it is too late.

Bugs in Tor network used in attacks against underground markets – The operator of an underground marketplace hosted within the Tor network has reported a flaw in Tor that he claims is being used for an ongoing denial of service attack on the site. The problem, which is similar to one reported by another hidden site operator in December on the Tor mailing list, allows attackers to conduct a denial of service attack against hidden sites by creating a large number of simultaneous connections, or “circuits,” via Tor, overwhelming the hidden service’s ability to respond. By sending multiple “introduce” requests to the same hidden service, an attacker could make the targeted server create multiple circuits (paths over the Tor network used for the session), eating the server’s available CPU and network resources and making it inaccessible to users.

How to stay safe online: CNET’s security checklist – It’s always better to be safe than sorry. Especially when it comes to your personal information. Keeping your info secure online requires you to take more time and care, but what you lose in moments you’ll surely make up in peace of mind. Follow the steps below to increase your online security.

Company News:

Last round of job cuts hit hundreds of Microsoft employees – In what is said to be the final round of layoffs for Microsoft’s largest jobs cut in company history, hundreds of employees were released by the company all around the world.

LinkedIn buys social knowledge startup Refresh – Launched three years ago, Refresh is designed to be a “digital briefing book” that can call up online information related to people that users are scheduled to meet. The information can be anything from blog posts, news articles or Facebook posts to personal notes or favorite sports teams. The Refresh mobile and desktop app is aimed at helping people relate to one another more quickly, but it can also be used to refresh one’s memory when running into acquaintances unexpectedly.

Antitrust lawsuit dismissed against Google’s app bundling – The latest class action antitrust lawsuit against Google has been tabled. The dismissed lawsuit was just one among many to hit Google such as a class action suit about Google Wallet’s privacy practices, libel accusations for offending autocomplete suggestions, and copyright infringement for book digitization. The lawsuit in question alleges that Google made illegal contracts with device makers which forced Android OS to use Google’s apps as default settings. The suit then further alleges that these backroom deals drove up consumer prices of these smartphones due to restricting competition.

Nissan CEO: We will have an autonomous vehicle next year – Nissan hopes to have a car that can navigate Japan’s highways on its own next year, and the company plans to have a completely self-driving vehicle for urban areas by 2020. “There will be a Nissan product in Japan, which will carry autonomous drive,” Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn told reporters at the New York International Auto Show on Thursday. “Obviously when you have this kind of technology, you want also the Japanese market to enjoy it as soon as possible.” Also this week, auto parts supplier Delphi announced its autonomous Audi completed a 3,500-mile, cross-country journey.

Games and Entertainment:

App showdown: Roku vs. Chromecast vs. Apple TV vs. Fire TV vs. Nexus Player – App selection should be one of the biggest factors in choosing a streaming media player, because all the fancy features in the world don’t mean much if you can’t actually watch what you want. If you’re just looking to watch Netflix or Hulu Plus, pretty much every device on the market will have you covered. Still, each platform does have its hang-ups, which you can see in the chart below. Have a look, then keep reading for some takeaways and caveats:

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Okay, now let’s answer some questions that I assume will be frequently asked:

Sony will issue either $25 cash or a $50 credit if you bought your PS Vita before June 2012 – In November, Sony was found guilty by the FTC of misleading consumers with their early PS Vita commercials. Now, they will be required to refund $25 cash or $50 in merchandise credit to lucky owners.

BBC teams with BitTorrent to release Doctor Who greatest hits download – Doctor Who fans can now download episodes from BitTorrent without feeling guilty! The BBC and the peer-to-peer sharing platform have officially teamed up to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the sci-fi series’ relaunch with two different BitTorrent Bundles. While this collection of episodes won’t tell the whole story or fully show new viewers why this universe continues to be incredibly popular among the sci-fi set, it does present some of the most beloved episodes in an easy-to-view, easy-to-obtain format that has the potential to rope in even more fans.

15 classic PC games you should play again – Between a flood of HD remasters (Grim Fandango, Homeworld, Resident Evil) and all the games styled to look like older games (Pillars of Eternity, Wasteland 2) released in the past year, I think we can all agree retro games are back in style. But what about actual retro games—the classics you’ve left gathering dust in old CD-ROM cases or are hoarding in your GOG.com library? April’s a relatively slow month as far as new releases, so maybe it’s the perfect time to revisit some old classics. Me? I’m about to go replay Planescape: Torment. Read on for that and fourteen(ish) other classic games you should play again.

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Duke Nukem 3D

Sling TV takes over DishWorld, re-names it ‘Sling International’ – Today, DishWorld — the international arm of Dish Network — is being re-branded under the Sling name, and will now be known as Sling International. As Sling International, DishWorld owners can access roughly 200 channels spanning 18 languages including Spanish, Punjab, Filipino, Arabic, Hindi, Vietnamese, and both Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese. Content includes sports, news, and general entertainment, and new customers are getting a free month to give Sling International a shot. Just like with DishWorld, there is no hardware to hook up.

Off Topic (Sort of):

This Is How Drones Work – When things look easy, they’re typically anything but. From Ted Williams’ swing to Raymond Carver’s prose to Jennifer Lawrence’s acting, this has been demonstrated time and time again. You might think it’s a leap to include drones with these effortless artists, but hold your judgement until after you watch an unmanned aircraft dance gracefully across the sky. Because while these machines may look like little more than propellers and plastic, these aerial acrobats actually pack a lot of tech into their lightweight frames.

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Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

Digital Love – What will it be like when Tinder and Grinder get taken over by advertising? Find out in this grim, hilarious assessment of the near future as created by Logan Fitzpatrick.

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Read the letter Bill Gates sent to Microsoft employees for the company’s 40th anniversary – On April 4th, 1975, Bill Gates and Paul Allen started a little company named Microsoft. You probably know the story from there: Gates went on to become the wealthiest man in the world, and then gradually pulled back from his company to focus on broad philanthropic efforts through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. But Gates is far from finished at Microsoft; last year after Satya Nadella took over as CEO, Gates said he would be taking a bigger role at the company — using up to a third of his time to advise Microsoft employees on new products. Gates sent the following letter to Microsoft employees today to celebrate the company’s 40th anniversary.

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I am not a booth babe. Ask me a question – Commentary: There’s been increasing debate about the role of women in the tech industry, and how they are perceived and portrayed at tech shows. One group has created a new symbol for women who want to stand out — but not as a booth babe.

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Teen rakes in $6,000 on “Uploader for Instagram” app, told to shut down – A developer has pulled his popular “Uploader for Instagram” app from the Mac App Store after Instagram sent him two demand letters. Last month, Caleb Benn, a 17-year-old Los Angeles high school student, released the $5 Mac desktop app that allowed users to upload photos to their Instagram accounts. Instagram had originally sent a letter to Benn on March 28, telling him that his app had violated the company’s Terms of Service. The letter stated that Benn had until March 30 to “fix things.” But after the deadline passed, the app was still available and Instagram had not taken any further action.

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Three lies about Google Glass – In general, the great masses of tech journalists and bloggers are a band of trendy and easily influenced conformists who sometimes care more about staying in tune with the echo chamber than about objective reality. The perfect example for this is how the tech press mob convinced everyone about three Google Glass lies: That Google Glass was an unacceptable invasion of privacy; that it was an overpriced elitist plaything; and that it was a failed and now dead project.

5 Charts That Show Why the iPad’s Fifth Birthday Is Bittersweet – See how crazy people were for the iPad back in 2010 — and how that’s changed

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Cop caught going ballistic on Uber driver apologizes on TV – Technically Incorrect: Detective Patrick Cherry, stripped of his badge for berating an Uber driver (in a YouTube video that went viral), tries to present his side of the story. A wise move?

Something to think about:

“Politeness and consideration for others is like investing pennies and getting dollars back.”

–     Thomas Sowell

Today’s Free Downloads:

WinParrot – WinParrot allows you to record the mouse clicks and keystrokes of your recurring tasks and execute them whenever you choose. Great for saving time on common daily actions.

WinParrot can record and control any application on Windows. It can be used to automate your recurring tasks, load your data into your applications (Internet Explorer, Oracle Applications, SAP …), test the robustness of an application by simulating multiple users, conduct demonstrations or training of an application (by slowing the speed of play and schedule tasks (schedule the execution of macros).

WinParrot requires no installation and no administration right.

Start recording your tasks or your entries, WinParrot will replay them immediately without programming.

With a very simple language (very close to that of Excel) you can insert visual checkpoints, loops, conditions or data from Excel spreadsheets.

You can control the tolerance of an image recognition, shapes or texts, change the speed of typing or moving the mouse….

In order to avoid slowing down your computer WinParrot is optimized to use the least possible of memory and CPU.

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FileVoyager – FileVoyager is a freeware Orthodox file manager (OFM) for Microsoft Windows. OFM’s are file managers using two panels of disks browsers.

This dual pane layout makes very easy the transfer operations of files or folders between sources and destinations.

FileVoyager contains a large collection of tools and functionality.

Features:

Browsing of disks, folders (real or virtual), shares, archives and FTP/FTPS in one unified way

Browsing can be done in various modes (like report or thumbnail modes)

Allowing usual file operations (rename, copy, move, link, delete, recycle) in the containers listed above and even between them

Packing and unpacking of ZIP, 7Zip, GZip, BZip2, XZ, Tar and WIM formats (FileVoyager wraps 7-zip)

Unpacking of ARJ, CAB, XAR, Z, RAR, LZH, LZMA, ISO, WIM and many others (FileVoyager wraps 7-zip)

Playing of virtually any Audio or Video formats (FileVoyager relies at once on installed codecs, on WMP and on VLC)

Offering quick preview capability for any file format with:

Rendering of multimedia files (including M3U, PLS, ASX, WPL, MPCPL and XSPF playlist formats)

Syntax highlighting for virtually any source code language/format (Powered by Scintilla)

Rendering final view for formats supported by Preview Handlers (like Office files, PDF, pictures, …)

Support of many character encodings (SBCS including various ANSI implementations, UTF-8, UTF-16, EBCDIC)

Displaying in flat or hexadecimal for any format

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In Pursuit of Freedom – The Pushback Continues:

After Obama’s cybersecurity order threatens Snowden fund, bitcoin donations spike – A new executive order signed into law this week by the president has one online community up in arms, after its loose wording effectively ruled out donating to Edward Snowden and others.

In a post on Reddit’s Bitcoin subreddit, members pledged to donate to the whistleblower’s relief fund, despite the wording of the new executive order suggesting that doing so was illegal.

In the new executive order, signed into law on Wednesday, US President Barack Obama declared cyber-threats aimed at the US a “national emergency.” The order threatens sanctions against those (including US residents) who engage in cyberattacks and espionage activities that threaten US interests at home and abroad.

The wording of the order specifically addresses any person whose “property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this order who might have a constitutional presence in the United States.”

Redditors were quick to assume (likely correctly) that this includes Edward Snowden, who for more than a year-and-a-half has lived in Russia, evading US justice.

“This is almost as bad as the Patriot Act,” said the user who first posted the thread.

Department of Homeland Security seeking national license plate database – Early last year, it was revealed the Department of Homeland Security was seeking a Federal License Plate Reader Database, something that was later abandoned in light of privacy concerns. Now the DHS has changed its mind and is again pursuing such a national database, soliciting bids from those who could provide it with such a product. The reason for its return is the department’s belief it can now mitigate those aforementioned privacy worries. To prove it, DHS has published a report detailing the info.

In New Video, Congressman Explains Why His Fellow Lawmakers Couldn’t Be Trusted with NSA Oversight – Congressmen who asked about oversight of NSA mass surveillance and domestic spying in 2013 could have “compromise[d] security” and were denied the records they sought because of concerns they lacked formal government security clearance, a former member of the House Intelligence Committee says in a newly-released video.

The footage, from an August 29, 2013 town hall meeting, sheds new light on why lawmakers were denied key rulings and reports from the secret courts overseeing the National Security Agency — even as the Obama administration and intelligence officials claimed that all NSA programs were subject to strict congressional oversight and therefore could be held accountable.

Light the torches! NSA’s BFF Senator Feinstein calls for e-book burning – Feinstein (D-CA) did not say exactly how she plans to scrub The Anarchist Cookbook and Inspire magazine from every server, desktop and notebook on the planet, but none the less she wants both titles pulled from circulation.

The comments come after two women were arrested in New York City on charges of plotting terrorist attacks.

The duo reportedly had ties to the late former editor of the Al-Qaeda backed English-language Inspire, and were accused of seeking out other bomb-making guides in preparation for an attack.

Now Feinstein, a big fan of America’s surveillance apparatus, wants to make both Inspire and the 1969 Anarchist Cookbook illegal to make available online.

“We must remain vigilant against these types of attacks and place a high priority on tracking and interdicting such plots,” the fifth-term Senator said.

Pointing up   When will American politicians, like this stupid woman, start to realize that they do not control the Internet. As a Canadian, I take offense at the suggestion that this technology challenged woman should have any impact on what is available to me, or anyone else for that matter, on the Internet.

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Filed under Free Software Downloads, Internet Security Alerts, Latest Tech News

Are You on Orkut? – Be Aware – Orkut Social Network Trojan!

orkutyouthicon.jpgA new and nasty Trojan, Orkut.AT, has been discovered by Security researchers at both Symantec and PandaLabs, which targets an Orkut user’s scrapbook. This self-propagating Trojan is designed to infect the computers of both the original victim, and the victim’s Orkut buddy list.

According to PandaLabs a profile appears in the targeted user’s scrapbook, which contains an image from a YouTube video. If the intended victim clicks the link, they are advised that if they wish to see the video a new codec needs to be downloaded. Downloading the codec installs the Orkut.AT Trojan which will then post a malicious message to the scrapbook of the original victim’s Orkut buddy list.

But that’s not all. The Trojan will then go on to download a range of malicious software to the victims’ systems.

The authors of this particular Trojan have added a creative twist; to avoid raising suspicions, the Trojan redirects users to a web page where they can find the video in question.

As with most Trojans, the user is the most important link in the chain leading to the installation and propagation of this infection. Without user interaction this Trojan, and ones like it, cannot succeed.

Luis Corrons, Technical Director of PandaLabs, provides advice that all Internet users should be well aware of, “to avoid falling victim to one of these malicious codes, users should have an up-to-date security solution that can detect both known and unknown malware.”

As well, it bears repeating: don’t click any links received though social networks, even though they might seem to come from reliable sources. Instead type the links directly into the browser’s address bar.

Each of us has an obligation to other Internet users to know, understand, and implement safe surfing practices. Failure to do so will guarantee that we will be faced with a continuing and increasing barrage, of Internet malware attacks. Each of us needs to take responsibility for our actions, while surfing the Internet.

For a review of free, downloadable security software read Need Free Security Programs? – 10 Of The Best!, on this Blog.

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Filed under Internet Safety, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Orkut, Safe Surfing, System Security, Windows Tips and Tools