Tag Archives: risk

Risk Rate Running Processes With Free Glary Security Process Explorer

Security Process Explorer, from the developer’s of the powerful, free system tool Glary Utilities, operates as an security tool, and provides advanced risk information on processes, running on your computer.

The program displays specific task manager information, (this application is not a replacement for Windows task manager), including file name, directory path, description, CPU usage, and so on. What sets the application apart, is the unique security risk rating that is applied to running processes.

Security process explorer new 1

The major caveat here however is, the user must make the decision whether a particular process, or program, should be terminated, or removed. Thankfully, you can get help in making that decision by clicking on the More Info Tab. Doing so, opens GlarySoft’s web based database where additional information about the specific program/process can be obtained, along with a risk factor for that inquiry, as the following graphic illustrates.

Security process explorer new 2

Note: As an added bonus you can even Google the process from within the application.

Using Security Process Explorer you can easily find and remove unnecessary background processes. As well, you can assign more resources to demanding processes like games, real-time multimedia applications and CD writing software, where necessary.

Quick facts:

Provides detailed information about all running processes

Specifies whether a process is safe or not

Single click process termination

Block unneeded processes or malware

Simple user interface

If you are an experienced/advanced computer user, and you’re looking for a program to strengthen your anti-malware resources, then Security Process Explorer is one that’s worth taking a look at.

System requirements: Windows 7, 2000, XP and Vista (32bit and 64bit).

Download at: GlarySoft

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Filed under 64 Bit Software, Anti-Malware Tools, downloads, Free Security Programs, Freeware, Software, System Utilities, Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools

Cyber Shopping on Black Friday? Six Tips From PandaLabs To Keep You Safe

imageCyber shopping on Black Friday can be very appealing – no lining up at midnight, no line ups at all, no risk of being trampled by unruly crowds, shop in your PJs if you like, “shopping around” and comparing prices is a snap, and the list of benefits goes on.

So, if you cyber shop, you may not face the risk of being trampled to death by an unruly crowd, or being shot to death by an angry shopper – both tragedies actually did happen on Black Friday, November 28, 2008. But, you will face substantial cyber security risks.

Staying safe while you cyber shop requires that you be much more wary, and that you understand that cyber crooks salivate at the opportunities Black Friday cyber shopping creates for exploiting the unwary and careless consumer.

Cyber shopping safely requires that you follow well established best practices that have proven to substantially reduce the risk of being victimized.

PandaLabs suggests holiday shoppers adhere to the following best practices this Friday and Monday, and throughout the holiday shopping season:

Avoid using search engines for locating special holiday deals. Criminals commonly turn to Blackhat SEO, which involves maliciously using search engine optimization around hot keywords to poison search engine results. Instead of using a search engine, go directly to reputable sites that you are familiar with. Screenshots of a recent malicious Black Friday search result is available at here.

Don’t click on embedded links in advertisement e-mails. E-mails that appear to be advertisements from legitimate vendors could be a well-disguised scam or malware attack. Chances are you’ll be able to find the same deal by going directly to the website in your favorite web browser.

Install all available operating system updates and patches. Cyber criminals are particularly skilled at exploiting critical vulnerabilities in operating systems and commonly used applications. Computer users are often silently redirected to a website with a carefully crafted malicious payload that leaves the computer infected with data-stealing malware or extortion-based threats. In addition to updating your system, PandaLabs strongly advises people to update Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, and Java software, which are all commonly targeted by cyber criminals.

Don’t underestimate criminals. Cyber criminals have no limits, and will create fake advertisements, shopping carts, poison various search terms and more in order infect your computer and steal your personal data. If you’re unsure if a site is legitimate, run a search online to see if you can determine whether it’s widely known. If you can’t find details on a retailer, PandaLabs advises holiday shoppers to take their business elsewhere.

Only purchase from sites that offer secure browsing (SSL/https). You can tell if a site uses SSL/https if there is a padlock icon on the bottom corner or in the address bar of your browser. Some browsers like Internet Explorer and Chrome turn the address bar green to indicate that the site is secure. Even if a site uses SSL/https, remember that SSL only works to create a secure Internet tunnel between you and the e-commerce server. You can still transmit sensitive data over to cyber criminals, so it’s best to run frequent anti-malware scans.

Always use updated anti-malware protection. Despite growing awareness of today’s Web-borne threats, many people still don’t use even a basic anti-virus solution and leave themselves vulnerable to infections, data loss and identity theft. You can download Panda Security’s award-winning Panda Cloud Antivirus software, which is completely free, here.

About PandaLabs:

Since 1990, PandaLabs, the malware research division of Panda Security, has led the industry in detecting, classifying and protecting consumers and businesses against new cyber threats.

At the core of the operation is Collective Intelligence, a proprietary system that provides real-time protection by harnessing Panda’s community of users to automatically detect, analyze, classify and disinfect more than 63,000 new malware samples daily.

The automated classification is complemented by a highly specialized global team of threat analysts, each focused on a specific type of malware, such as viruses, Trojans, worms, spyware and other exploits, to ensure around-the-clock protection.

Learn more about PandaLabs and subscribe to the PandaLabs blog here. Follow Panda on Twitter and Facebook.

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Filed under Cyber Shopping Tips, cybercrime, Don't Get Scammed, Don't Get Hacked, Internet Security Alerts, Panda Security, PandaLabs, Safe Online Shopping Tips

Internet Dating And Extortion – Real Life Mirrors Fiction

imageThis past week, I reread The Brethren, a novel by American author John Grisham, first published in 2000. The novel’s plot centers on a scam in which three incarcerated Judges blackmail wealthy closeted gay men who unwittingly (through letters), provide the rogue Judges, who collectively are posing as a young gay man, with all the information needed to make the blackmail scam a winner.

In case you want to read the book (I highly recommend it – Grisham is a terrific novelist), I won’t spoil it for you by revealing additional story elements, but suffice it to say, that the naiveté of the victims in providing highly personal information, drives the plot forward.

But this is just fiction – a made up story. In “real” life this type of situation, or a  situation similar to it, just wouldn’t happen, right? Ah, but it does – as illustrated in the following news report from a recent edition of the Toronto Star newspaper.

Rather than rely on snail mail, as the fictional characters in the novel do, the Internet is the weapon of choice in the following scam, as you’ll see.

Police say a number of men looking for love on the Internet found extortion instead.

Halton Regional Police allege a man joined a number of adult dating service websites posing as a woman and prospective date for male subscribers. The interested men were then persuaded to provide personal information about themselves.

Police say the information provided by the unsuspecting victims in emails, chats, texts and voice mail messages then formed the basis for extortion. There were threats to publish the information on social networking sites or send it directly to family, friends, or employers unless monetary demands were met.

Kevin Fletcher, 43, of Burlington, Ont., faces eight counts of extortion and one of criminal harassment.

The Internet and its associated tools, including those tools mentioned in the newspaper report – emails, chats, texts and voice mail messages, seems to have affected the victims’ brain functions. Normal personal security precautions appear to have been thrown out the window; including common sense – assuming they had any common sense to begin with!

I have no doubt, that the victims in this case would have benefited from reading Internet Security: There’s an App for That – Your BRAIN!, posted here earlier this year.

There’s a lesson in this sad story – establishing a personal relationship through Internet dating, despite the success stories touted in numerous television commercials, is not without risk. And, should be approached with the same sense of caution and awareness, that one would use in any Internet transaction.

image

That old truism – “Nobody knows you’re a Dog on the Internet” – takes on special significance when it comes to online dating.

A sampling of common sense Internet dating safety tips from the Wired Safety Website.

Do not believe everything you read online

You can be anything or anyone you want to be online. I keep trying to get people to believe that I am tall, blonde and gorgeous! (So far, no takers…). That cute brunette 24-year-old guy may not be cuter, may not be 24 and most importantly, may not be a guy. There is not truth in advertising protection when you date online.

Do not give out personal information online

Personal information that would let someone find you offline would never be shared online. Your full name, where you work, where you live, your phone number (see my note on giving out your phone number), your fax number…these should not be shared online.

Use an online dating service that uses an anonymizer or re-mailer to mask your real e-mail, or set up a Hotmail or other free account just for dating online. Cyber romance can quickly turn to cyberstalking – it is better to be able to terminate that particular account than to have to set up a new main account, and notify everyone you know.

To read the full list of Internet dating safety tips, visit Wired Safety.org.

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Filed under cybercrime, Don't Get Scammed, email scams, Internet Dating Safety Tips, Internet Safety, internet scams, Online Safety, Windows Tips and Tools

Is Your Internet Neighborhood Overly Risky?

image In the real world, the neighborhood in which you live can have some impact on the chances of you been victimized by a crime. In the virtual world, the same principal is in operation – if we can, for the sake of discussion, call the country in which you live your “neighborhood”.

In a recent study (released August 26), by AVG, attack data from 100 million PCs in 144 countries during the last week of July, 2010, was analyzed. From the data, AVG was able to develop a security threat risk factor assessment based on the country in which a user resides.

I was not surprised to see Japan proved to be the safest Internet neighborhood. Nor was I surprised to see that North America (all three countries taken together), is the riskiest, with a user facing a 1 in 51 daily chance of being attacked. Europe, on the other hand, is somewhat safer, with a user facing a 1 in 72 daily chance of being attacked.

Selected survey results:

Turkey leads the league table for risky surfing, with AVG’s software having to step in to protect on average, one in 10 users of the Internet. Web users in Russia (1 in 14 were hit), Armenia (1 in 24), and Azerbaijan (1 in 39) also suffer high rates of attacks

Other areas where Web surfers are disproportionately at risk include Bangladesh (1 in 41), Pakistan (1 in 48) and in Vietnam and Laos in Southeast Asia, where the chances of facing an attack are both one in 42.

What about other major Western countries? The United States ranks number nine when it comes to the riskiest places to surf the Web (1 in 48), the United Kingdom ranks 31st (1 in 63), Australia comes in 37th (1 in 75) while Germany comes in at number 41 (1 in 83).

Leone had the fewest attacks with, on average, one in 692 Web surfers facing an attack. Niger also fared well, with just one in 442 Web surfers on average experiencing an attack. It is important to note however that these countries have a low level of internet access, with low broadband penetration.

It is because of its high internet use and broadband penetration that Japan, where there is an average of just one in 404 facing an attack, is arguably the safest place to surf the net.

Meanwhile Taiwan (1 in 248 attacked), Argentina (1 in 241 attacked), and France (1 in 224 attacked) all came in the top 20 safe list.

It’s important to remember that this survey, like all such surveys, is a one time snapshot. Internet threats are not static. Threats, in both the number and complexity, can fluctuate wildly.

A common sense tip worth repeating:

Be proactive when it comes to your computer and your connected device’s security; part of that is making sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances you will fall victim to cyber crime.

Recommended reading: Principles of Security: Keeping it Simple – by guest writer Mark Schneider, and – An Anti-malware Test – Common Sense Wins.

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Filed under cybercrime, Don't Get Scammed, Don't Get Hacked, Internet Security Alerts, Malware Advisories, Reports, Safe Surfing, Tech Net News, Windows Tips and Tools

Security Process Explorer – Checks Security Risk

Security Process Explorer, from the developer’s of the powerful, free system tool Glary Utilities, operates as an security tool, and provides advanced risk information on processes, running on your computer.

The program displays specific task manager information, (this application is not a replacement for Windows task manager), including file name, directory path, description, CPU usage, and so on. What sets the application apart, is the unique security risk rating that is applied to running processes.

Security process explorer new 1

The major caveat here however is, the user must make the decision whether a particular process, or program, should be terminated, or removed. Thankfully, you can get help in making that decision by clicking on the More Info Tab. Doing so, opens GlarySoft’s web based database where additional information about the specific program/process can be obtained, along with a risk factor for that inquiry, as the following graphic illustrates.

Security process explorer new 2

Note: As an added bonus you can even Google the process from within the application.

Using Security Process Explorer you can easily find and remove unnecessary background processes. As well, you can assign more resources to demanding processes like games, real-time multimedia applications and CD writing software, where necessary.

Quick facts:

Provides detailed information about all running processes

Specifies whether a process is safe or not

Single click process termination

Block unneeded processes or malware

Simple user interface

If you are an experienced/advanced computer user, and you’re looking for a program to strengthen your anti-malware resources, then Security Process Explorer is one that’s worth taking a look at.

I should point out however, that I found Windows 7 process information to be less than I expected.

System requirements: Windows 7, 2000, XP and Vista (32bit and 64bit).

Download at: GlarySoft

If you found this article useful, why not subscribe to this Blog via RSS, or email? It’s easy; just click on this link and you’ll never miss another Tech Thoughts article.

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Filed under Anti-Malware Tools, Don't Get Hacked, downloads, Freeware, Software, System Utilities, Utilities, Windows 7, Windows Tips and Tools, Windows Vista, Windows XP

Check Process Security – Free Glarysoft Security Process Explorer

Glarysoft_logo Glarysoft, the developer of the powerful, free system tool Glary Utilities (which should be part of every casual/intermediate computers users’ toolbox), also offers a free enhanced task manager; Security Process Explorer. This application though, is better suited to experienced or advanced computer users.

Security Process Explorer operates very much like A-squared HiJackFree but with an additional twist. Operating as an enhanced task manager, the program provides advanced risk information about programs, and processes, running on your computer.

The program displays all the usual task manager information, including file name, directory path, description, CPU usage, and so on. What sets the application apart is the unique security risk rating that is applied to running programs and processes.

Security process explorer 2

The major caveat here however is, the user must make the decision whether a particular process, or program, should be terminated or removed. Thankfully, you can get help in making that decision by clicking on the More Info Tab. Doing so, opens Glarysoft’s web based database where additional information about the specific program/process can be obtained, along with a risk factor for that inquiry.

If you make a mistake, the application offers a way out. Just go to the Edit Tab and reverse the action.

Using Security Process Explorer you can easily find and remove unnecessary background processes. As well, you can assign more resources to demanding processes like games, real-time multimedia applications and CD writing software, where necessary.

Quick facts:

  • Provides detailed information about all running processes
  • Specifies whether a process is safe or not
  • Single click process termination
  • Block unneeded processes or malware
  • Simple user interface

System requirements: Windows 2003, Windows Vista, Windows NT, Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows 98

If you are an experienced/advanced computer user, and you’re looking for a program to strengthen your anti-malware resources, then Security Process Explorer is one that’s worth taking a look at.

Download at: Download.com

Comments Off on Check Process Security – Free Glarysoft Security Process Explorer

Filed under Anti-Malware Tools, Don't Get Hacked, Freeware, Geek Software and Tools, Manual Malware Removal, Software, Spyware - Adware Protection, System Security, System Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools

Glarysoft Security Process Explorer – Rate Running Processes for Security

Glarysoft, the developer’s of the powerful, free system tool Glary Utilities (which should be part of every casual/intermediate computers users’ toolbox), also offers a free enhanced task manager; Security Process Explorer. This application though, is better suited to experienced or advanced computer users.

Security Process Explorer operates very much like A-squared HiJackFree but with an additional twist. Operating as an enhanced task manager, the program provides advanced risk information about programs, and processes, running on your computer.

The program displays all the usual task manager information, including file name, directory path, description, CPU usage, and so on. What sets the application apart is the unique security risk rating that is applied to running programs and processes.

security-process-explorer-2

The major caveat here however is, the user must make the decision whether a particular process, or program, should be terminated or removed. Thankfully, you can get help in making that decision by clicking on the More Info Tab. Doing so, opens Glarysoft’s web based database where additional information about the specific program/process can be obtained, along with a risk factor for that inquiry.

If you make a mistake, the application offers a way out. Just go to the Edit Tab and reverse the action.

Using Security Process Explorer you can easily find and remove unnecessary background processes. As well, you can assign more resources to demanding processes like games, real-time multimedia applications and CD writing software, where necessary.

Quick facts:

Provides detailed information about all running processes

Specifies whether a process is safe or not

Single click process termination

Block unneeded processes or malware

Simple user interface

If you are an experienced/advanced computer user, and you’re looking for a program to strengthen your anti-malware resources, then Security Process Explorer is one that’s worth taking a look at.

Download at: Download.com

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Filed under Anti-Malware Tools, Don't Get Hacked, Free Security Programs, Freeware, Geek Software and Tools, Interconnectivity, Manual Malware Removal, Security Rating Applications, Software, Spyware - Adware Protection, System Security, Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools