Tag Archives: Q and A session

An Interview With An Anarchist Hacker

imageWe’ve reported on the issue of software piracy, and the theft of intellectual property, a number of times. So, it’s easy for me to sum up my position on this contentious matter – there is no justifiable reason to steal software, or the work of others. It is piracy, and it is a CRIME.

The recently released Seventh Annual BSA and IDC Global Software Piracy Study, made the point that “for every $100 worth of legitimate software sold, an additional $75 worth of unlicensed software made its way onto the market.”

Selected findings from this study include:

Commercial value of software theft exceeds $50 billion: the commercial value of unlicensed software put into the market in 2009 totaled $51.4 billion.

Progress on piracy held through the recession: the rate of PC software piracy dropped in nearly half (49%) of the 111 economies studied, remained the same in 34% and rose in 17%.

Piracy continues to rise on a global basis: the worldwide piracy rate increased from 41% in 2008 to 43% in 2009; largely a result of exponential growth in the PC and software markets in higher piracy, fast growing markets such as Brazil, India and China.

It’s obvious then, that intellectual property theft is “big business”, and is unlikely to disappear any time soon. Currently in fact, there is a huge pushback campaign being waged against those organizations who support anti-piracy.

According to PandaLabs, the malware research arm of Panda Security, there is an ongoing offensive, appropriately called “Operation Payback”, which is employing targeted DDoS attacks against various companies and agencies, including the Motion Picture Association of America, and the Recording Industry Association of America, who support the anti-piracy lobby.

The question is – is there support out in the hinterland for this sort of hacking effort? If the following comment, which I picked up on a comment forum, is any indication, the answer is a resounding – YES.

“Big Media is reaping what they sowed and so its hard to find any sympathy for them or any fault in those who have found a way to fight back for much of the highly questionable actions these conglomerates and their law firms have taking these past few years.

The fact that they are unwilling to see how realistic this threat is to them just shows how arrogant or incompetent they are. While they won’t be getting help from me, these grass roots strike back at big media campaigns will find far more support and help on their end then what Big media could ever hope to buy.”

So, how and why, do those who are responsible for “Operation Payback” justify a criminal cyber attack against organizations whose mission is to enforce existing intellectual property rights?

Sean-Paul Correll, a threat researcher with Panda Security, in speaking with some of the organizers of  “Operation Payback” in a Q&A session, has discovered some surprising answers.

Here’s a small taste of Sean-Paul’s Q&A session –

If you were able to resolve this situation, what would you want the respective media authorities of the world to do?

A: Personally, I would want them to basically go the fuck away altogether. Remove the barbaric laws they have lobbied for. Treat people like PEOPLE instead of criminals. Their long outdated traditional views on copyright infringement enforced solely by rich and powerful corporations need to be modified in light of the modern age on the Internet, the Information Age.

Sean-Paul’s full Q&A session makes interesting reading and is available here.

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