Tag Archives: iFrame

Search Engine Malware – The Same Old, Same Old

In the News within the past 3 days

Web security firm Armorize – over 6 million e-commerce web pages have been compromised in order to serve malware to users.

Ed Bott Report – criminal gangs that specialize in malware love search engines, because they represent an ideal vector for getting Windows users to click on links that lead to potentially dangerous Trojans. The latest attack targets ads, and the social engineering is frighteningly good.

Not in the News

The specifics may be news but, this particular malware attack vector is so old I’m surprised that more Internet users aren’t aware of it. No, I take that back – based on a conversation I had just last night.

Me: “So, what antimalware applications are you currently running?”

She: “Well, I can cut and paste and I can get on the Internet, but I don’t worry about all that other stuff. I don’t understand it anyway.”

I’m well past the point where I allow myself to show surprise when I hear this type of response – it’s just so typical. Given that level of knowledge, it’s hardly surprising then, that consumer confidence in the reliability of search engine results, including relevant ads, is taken for granted.

I’ve yet to meet a typical user who would consider questioning a search engine’s output as to its relevant safety.  It’s been my experience, that typical Internet users blindly assume all search engine results are malware free.

This, despite the reality that the manipulation of search engine results, exploiting legitimate pages, and the seeding of malicious websites among the top results returned by search engines in order to infect users with malware, is a continuing threat to system security.

Here’s how the cyber crooks do it:

When a potential victim visits one of these infected sites the likelihood of the downloading of malicious code onto the computer by exploiting existing vulnerabilities is high.

Let’s take, as an example, a typical user running a search for “great vacation spots” on one of the popular search engines.

Unknown to the user, the search engine returns a malicious or compromised web page as one of the most popular sites. Users with less than complete Internet security who visit this page will have an extremely high chance of becoming infected.

There are a number of ways that this can occur. Cyber-crooks can exploit vulnerabilities on the server hosting the web page to insert an iFrame, (an HTML element which makes it possible to embed another HTML document inside the main document). The iFrame can then activate the download of malicious code by exploiting additional vulnerabilities on the visiting machine.

Alternatively, a new web page can be built, with iFrames inserted, that can lead to malware downloads. This new web page appears to be legitimate. In the example mentioned earlier, the web page would appear to be a typical page offering great vacation spots.

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

Install an Internet Browser add-on such as WOT (my personal favorite), which provides detailed test results on a site’s safety; protecting you from security threats including spyware, adware, spam, viruses, browser exploits, and online scams

Don’t open unknown email attachments

Don’t run programs of unknown origin

Disable hidden filename extensions

Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched

Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use

Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible

Disable scripting features in email programs

Make regular backups of critical data

Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised

Turn off file and printer sharing on the computer

Install a personal firewall on the computer

Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet

Ensure the anti-virus software scans all e-mail attachments

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

The following comment (posted here March 15, 2011), illustrates perfectly the issues discussed in this article.

Funny you write about this today. I was reading about the spider issue Mazda was having and wanted to know what the spider looked like so I Googled it, went to images and there it was. There was also a US map that had areas highlighted, assuming where the spiders exist, and before I clicked on the map I made sure there was the green “O” for WOT for security reasons.

I clicked on the map and BAM I was redirected instantly and hit w/ the “You have a virus” scan malware. I turned off my modem then shut my computer off. I restarted it and scanned my computer w/ MS Security Essentials and Super Anti Spyware. MS Essentials found Exploit:Java/CVE-2010-0094.AF, and Trojan:Java/Mesdeh and removed them. I use WOT all the time, but now I’m going to be super cautious.

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Filed under Application Vulnerabilities, Browser add-ons, Cyber Crime, Cyber Criminals, Don't Get Scammed, Don't Get Hacked, downloads, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, Internet Security Alerts, Malware Protection, Online Safety, Search Engines, Software, trojans, Windows Tips and Tools

Drive-by Downloads – Update Your Browser Right Now!

Your Firewall and Security Applications along with your Browser security add-ons provide the ultimate in protection while you’re surfing the web, right? Well in a sense they do.

Paradoxically, it’s because current anti-malware solutions are marginally more effective than they have ever been in detecting worms and viruses, that we’re now faced with another insidious form of attack.

Drive-by downloads are not new; they’ve been lurking around for years it seems, but they’ve become much more common and more crafty recently.

More than three million unique URLs on over 180,000 websites are automatically installing malware via drive-by downloads, according to recent statements by the Google Anti-Malware Team.

Google has not been alone in noticing this trend by cyber-criminals using these techniques. According to IBM cyber-criminals are directly attacking web browsers in order to steal identities, gain access to online accounts and conduct other criminal activities.

If you’re unfamiliar with the term, drive-by download, they are essentially programs that automatically download and installed on your computer without your knowledge. This action can occur while visiting an infected web site, opening an infected HTML email, or by clicking on a deceptive popup window.

Drive-by downloads work by targeting Internet browser vulnerabilities to download and run malware automatically when a user visits the site. Don’t think that by staying away from dangerous website such as adult sites that you’re any safer. The fact is these infected websites are all over the Internet.

Often more than one program is downloaded, for example, file sharing with tracking spyware is very common. Again, it’s important to remember that this can take place without warning, or your approval.

Recent statistics seem to indicate that 40% of frequent Internet users continue to use an outdated version of their current Internet browser. Statistics generated from my own Blog stats put this figure at 31%. These users’ are essentially already victims just waiting to be victimized again.

Do you want to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim? Then there is a really easy way to do that – update your browser to the latest version now. Right now!

While all Internet browsers can be subject to vulnerabilities, the free FireFox browser from Mozilla is the browser of choice for most security conscious users, and is preferred by those who tend to think “Geeky”, due to the amazing number of add-ons that increase safety and functionality.

Download FireFox here.

You need to be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security by making sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

If you missed “Rogue Security Software on the Rise – What You Need to Know Now!” you can read it here.

For a different take on Google’s new browser checkout TechPaul’s “A Real Life Review of Google’s New Browser”.

3 Comments

Filed under Application Vulnerabilities, Browsers, Firefox, Freeware, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Safe Surfing, System Security, Windows Tips and Tools

Drive-by Downloads – The Paradox Created by Firewalls/Security Applications

Your Firewall and Security Applications provide the ultimate in protection while you’re surfing the web, right? Well in a sense they do.

Paradoxically, it’s because current anti-malware solutions are much more effective than they have ever been in detecting worms and viruses, that we’re now faced with another insidious form of attack.

Drive-by downloads are not new; they’ve been lurking around for years it seems, but they’ve become much more common and more crafty recently.

More than three million unique URLs on over 180,000 websites are automatically installing malware via drive-by downloads, according to recent statements by the Google Anti-Malware Team. Google has not been alone in noticing this trend by criminal hackers using these techniques. IBM noted recently, that criminals are directly attacking web browsers in order to steal identities, gain access to online accounts and conduct other illicit activities.

If you’re unfamiliar with the term, drive-by download, they are essentially programs that automatically download and installed on your computer without your knowledge. This action can occur while visiting an infected web site, as previously noted, opening an infected HTML email, or by clicking on a deceptive popup window. Often more than one program is downloaded, for example, file sharing with tracking spyware is very common. Again, it’s important to remember that this can take place without warning, or your approval.

What can you do to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim?

The following are actions you can take to protect your computer system:

  • When surfing the web: Stop. Think. Click
  • Don’t open unknown email attachments
  • Don’t run programs of unknown origin
  • Disable hidden filename extensions
  • Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched
  • Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use
  • Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible
  • Disable scripting features in email programs
  • Make regular backups of critical data
  • Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised
  • Turn off file and printer sharing on the computer.
  • Install a personal firewall on the computer.
  • Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet
  • Ensure the anti-virus software scans all e-mail attachments
  • Install McAfee Site Advisor, WOT, or a similar browser add-on

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

If you missed “Rogue Security Software on the Rise – What You Need to Know Now!” you can read it here.

4 Comments

Filed under Browsers, Email, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, internet scams, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Rogue Software, rootkits, Safe Surfing, Spyware - Adware Protection, Windows Tips and Tools

Fake/Redirected Search Engine Results = Malware


For the past several months I’ve been watching closely, as more and more Blog discussions have been taking place around the topic of search engines results and malware.

Recent news on this issue from Panda Security’s Oxygen 3 E-bulletin on IT security, indicates that Cyber-crooks are unrelenting in their chase to infect web search results. According to Panda “there is a steady increase in the use of custom-built websites designed to drop malicious code on computers, or even the manipulation of legitimate pages in order to infect users with malware.”

PandaLabs maintains that cyber-crooks have begun to opt for a new technique: the manipulation of search engine results, or seeding websites among the top results returned by these engines. When a potential victim visits one of these sites the likelihood of the downloading of malicious code onto the computer by exploiting existing vulnerabilities is high.

There are several ways that this can occur. Cyber-crooks can exploit vulnerabilities on the server hosting the web page to insert an iFrame, (an HTML element which makes it possible to embed another HTML document inside the main document). The iFrame can then activate the download of malicious code by exploiting additional vulnerabilities on the visiting machine.

Alternatively, a new web page can be built, with iFrames inserted, that can lead to malware downloads. This new web page appears to be legitimate.

Another method is the insertion of false dialogue boxes, fake toolbars, and more on sites; all designed to load destructive malware which could include rootkits, password stealers, Trojan horses, and spam bots.

For more information on this, and other threats checkout Spyware Sucks, a great Blog that will keep you up to date on the latest risks to your online safety.

So what can you do to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim?

As I have pointed out in the past on this Blog, the following are actions you can take to protect your computer system:

• Don’t open unknown email attachments

• Don’t run programs of unknown origin

• Disable hidden filename extensions

• Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched

• Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use

• Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible

• Disable scripting features in email programs

• Make regular backups of critical data

• Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised

• Turn off file and printer sharing on the computer.

• Install a personal firewall on the computer.

• Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet.

• Ensure the anti-virus software scans all e-mail attachments.

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

The free software listed below, in my view, provides better than average malware protection.

avast! 4 Home Edition

www.avast.com

This anti virus app is a real fighter, scanning files on demand and on access, including email attachments. Let’s you know when it detects mal-ware through its shield function. An important feature is a boot-time scan option which removes mal-ware that can’t be removed any other way.

AVG Anti-Virus Free Edition

www.free.grisoft.com

Similarly, this program scans files on access, on demand, and on schedule. Scans email; incoming and outgoing. For those on Vista, your in luck, it’s Vista-ready. I have been using this application since its release and it now forms part of my front line defenses. I recommend this one highly.

Ad-Aware 2007

www.lavasoftusa.com

In my view, Ad-Aware 2007 Free is the best free spyware and adware remover available. It does a relatively good job of protecting against known data-mining, Trojans, dialers, malware, browser hijackers and tracking components. The only downside with the free version; real-time protection is not included.

ThreatFire 3

www.threatfire.com

ThreatFire 3 blocks mal-ware, including zero-day threats, by analyzing program behavior and it does a stellar job. Again, this is one of the security applications that forms part of my front line defenses. I have found it to have high success rate at blocking mal-ware based on analysis of behavior. Highly recommend this one!

Comodo Firewall Pro

www.comodogroup.com

The definitive free firewall, Comodo Firewall protects your system by defeating hackers and restricting unauthorized programs from accessing the Internet. I have been using this application for 6 months and I continue to feel very secure. It resists being forcibly terminated and it works as well, or better, than any firewall I’ve paid for. This is one I highly recommend. Amazing that it’s free!

WinPatrol

www.winpatrol.com

Do you want to get a better understanding of what programs are being added to your computer? Then WinPatrol is the program for you. With WinPatrol, in your system tray, you can monitor system areas that are often changed by malicious programs. You can monitor your startup programs and services, cookies and current tasks. Should you need to, WinPatrol allows you to terminate processes and enable, or disable, startup programs. There are additional features that make WinPatrol a very powerful addition to your security applications.

Sandboxie

www.sandboxie.com

Surfing the Internet without using Sandboxie is, to me, like jumping out of an airplane without a parachute. Deadly! This application creates a “Sandboxed” protected environment on your machine within which you browse the net. Data that is written to your hard drive is simply eliminated, (or not, your choice), when the sandbox is closed. Utilizing this application allows you to surf the web without the risk of infecting your system with mal-ware or other nasties. This is another security application I have been using for over 6 months and it has yet to let me down. Highly recommended.

Snoop Free Privacy Shield

www.snoopfree.com

Snoop Free Privacy Shield is a powerful application that guards your keyboard, screen and open windows from all spy software. I have been using this application for quite some time, and I have been amazed at the number of programs that have requested access to my keyboard and screen. Particularly, programs that I am in the process of installing. If you’re serious about privacy, this is a must have addition to your security toolbox.

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Filed under Anti-Keyloggers, Anti-Malware Tools, Application Vulnerabilities, Free Security Programs, Freeware, Internet Safety, internet scams, Online Safety, rootkits, Safe Surfing, Search Engines, Software, Spyware - Adware Protection, System Security, System Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools