Tag Archives: download

Zemana AntiLogger – Free One Year License Today At Glarysoft Giveaway

https://billmullins.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/image27.png?w=92&h=92Back in the day, when I had an interest in sponsoring giveaways, I sponsored a giveaway on behalf of  Zemana AntiLogger. Without a doubt, this was the most professional giveaway I have ever had the pleasure in sponsoring. Zemana set up a special page on their site, specifically designed for the sponsored giveaway which led to 2000+ downloads through that page.

I’ve long considered Zemana AntiLogger a must have security application for my Internet connected machines. In fact, I would never connect my web cam without first ensuring that Zemana AntiLogger was up and running. To drive home that point (and others), I’ve reviewed this application several times.

Today only, a one year license is available at no cost through Glarysoft  (the Glary Utilities folks). Rather than reinvent the wheel, it seems appropriate to rerun the following review which was initially posted January 9, 2010.

Take a read, see what you think – and, if you’re convinced that Zemana AntiLogger would be a worthwhile addition to your overall security structure then, take a run over to Glarysoft and download this super security application.

Note: During my initial testing of this application, I ran a series of Anti-Keylogger tests, including tests for web cam penetration. All test methods were defeated by Zemana AntiLogger.

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Zemana AntiLogger – An Ounce of Prevention

image Benjamin Franklin could have been talking about the Internet, and malware, when he reportedly said – “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

Curing a malware infection caused by today’s sophisticated malware is much more difficult than it has ever been, and I’m convinced, that removing the malware we’re going to have to contend with in 2010, will be incrementally harder still.

Even today, malware tends to write itself into multiple parts of the operating system, and in many cases it can hide its files, registry entries, running process and services, making the infection virtually impossible to find, and remove, without causing operating system damage.

In the coming year, an average computer user who has to deal with even more complex malware infections, will be left with little choice other than having the infected machine worked on by a certified computer technician, who will have the tools, and the competency, to determine if the infection can be removed without causing system damage.

We’ve previously discussed Keylogger malware here, and how to employ an ounce of prevention by using highly regarded SnoopFree Privacy Shield, a free application, which unfortunately, is compatible with Windows XP only.

Because Keyloggers, a particularly sinister type of malware, that monitors every keystroke a user types on a computer’s keyboard, are often executed as part of a rootkit, or a remote administration (RAT) Trojan horse, they can be extremely difficult to detect, and remove.

While it’s true, that many good quality malware and spyware detection tools should capture Keyloggers, and a properly configured Firewall should prevent all authorized connections, the reality is – this is NOT always the case. Keyloggers in fact, can disable Firewalls and anti-malware tools.

Since my personal home machines now run on Windows 7, I can no longer protect against Keyloggers using SnoopFree Privacy Shield, so I had to find an alternative. Unfortunately, I could not find a freeware substitute application. However, I did find a competitively priced application, Zemana AntiLogger, following a reader’s recommendation, which I’ve been testing for a week or so.

I was immediately impressed by this application, particularly the system defense function. The application intercepted proposed changes to system files NOT picked up by other security applications on my system.

Since I use a Webcam extensively for communicating, I was more than happy to see the active Webcam protection offered by Zemana AntiLogger, which was immediately apparent.

Zamana Antilogger 2

Test Screens:

This is an example of a Zemana warning, triggered by my launching an anonymous proxy application which by design, injects code into my primary Browser. By checking an appropriate check box I established a rule, permitting this action in future.

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This is an example of a Zemana warning, triggered by my updating both Microsoft Security Essentials and Malwarebytes definition databases which, in each case, will make changes to system files. Simply checking a check box establishes a rule, which will permit this action in future.

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This is an example of a Zemana warning, triggered by a screen capture utility I was in the process of using. If this had been an illegal activity. I would of course, have received the same warning. Again, simply checking a check box establishes a rule, which will permit this action, by this utility, in future.

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Fast facts:

Secure your Internet banking and financial transactions

Protect information in emails and Instant Messages

Protect keystrokes from spyware

Protect all screen images

Webcam Logger protection

System Defense

No need to download latest virus signatures

No need to know or detect the malware’s signature

No need to wait for updates from a virus lab

No need to scan files

Proactively looks for suspicious activity

Catches not just the usual suspects, but also sophisticated “zero day” malware

Prevents theft of data via secure connections (HTTPS / SSL)

Does not slow down your PC

Easy to download, install and use

Future-proof

System requirements: Windows XP with Service Pack 2 or higher (32bit and 64bit). Vista (32bit and 64bit). Windows 7 (32bit and 64bit). Windows 8 (32bit and 64bit).

If keylogger protection, and maintaining your privacy is a concern, you might consider adding this application to your security toolbox.

Download at: Glarysoft

Please note the following terms and conditions:

No free technical support. No free upgrades to future versions. Strictly non-commercial usage.

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Filed under Anti-Malware Tools, downloads, Giveaways

EULAlyzer – A Free Tool To Help “Uncomplicate” End User License Agreements

imageI’ve always considered that reading a EULA (End User License Agreement), is sort of like reading the phone book; and who reads a phone book?

I must admit that I get bored and distracted when reading EULA text; especially since I’m forced to read reams of small text, in a small window, which requires me to scroll continuously. I suspect, I’m not alone in this, and that most people just skim over the text; or more to the point – don’t bother reading the EULA at all.

However, there’s a downside risk in not reading the EULA carefully. By not reading the EULA carefully, we may let ourselves in for some unwelcome, annoying, and potentially dangerous surprises.

One of the most important aspects of any software license agreement is, the information it provides concerning the intentions of the software, and whether there are additional components bundled with the main application.

Additional components that could potentially display pop-up ads, transmit personal identifiable information back to the developer, or use unique tracking identifiers.

Not all software applications contain these additional components of course, but you need to be aware of those that do when you are considering installing an application.

Software developers who choose to employ these tools (to gather information for example), are generally not underhanded, and in most cases there is full disclosure of their intent contained in the EULA. But here’s the rub – virtually no one reads EULAs.

EULAlyzer, a free application from BrightFort (formerly: Javacool Software), the SpywareBlaster developer, can make reading and analyzing license agreements, while not a pleasure, at least not as painful.

This free application quickly scans a EULA, and points out words, statements, and phrases, that you need to consider carefully. Results are rated by “Interest Level” and organized by category, so it’s easy to zero-in on the issue that concern you the most.

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Working similar to an anti-spyware program, EULAlyzer flags suspicious wording on a scale of 1 to 10 – based on how critical the disclosed information can be to your security, or privacy.

Let’s take a look at the license agreement for Piriform’s CCleaner.

You’ll note that there three areas of limited concern that have been flagged – as shown in the screen shot, below. Clicking on “Goto” icon will expand the related wording.

I’m very familiar with Piriform’s freeware applications – nevertheless, as is my habit, I read the EULA carefully.

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Let’s take a look at the license agreement for GOM Audio Player.

Again, EULAlyzer has flagged a number of issues – but, in this case, these are issues that I considered very carefully before installation this application.

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If you, like me, download freeware frequently, then you need to read the software license agreement carefully. EULAlyzer will make it easier for you to focus on the important aspects of the agreement.

There is no doubt that we could all use a little help in working our way through these wordy, but necessary agreements. The reality is, all software EULAs should be read carefully.

Fast facts:

Discover potentially hidden behavior about the software you’re going to install.

Pick up on things you missed when reading license agreements.

Keep a saved database of the license agreements you view.

Instant results – super-fast analysis in just a second.

EULAlyzer makes it simple to instantly identify highly interesting and important parts of license agreements, privacy policies, and other similar documents, including language that deals with:

Advertising

Tracking

Data Collection

Privacy-Related Concerns

Installation of Third-Party or Additional Software

Inclusion of External Agreements By Reference

Potentially Suspicious Clauses

and, much more…

System requirements: Windows XP, Vista, Win 7, Win 8.

Download at: Major Geeks

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Filed under Don't Get Scammed, downloads, Freeware, Software, Utilities

Malware Hunting? Checkout These 20 + Free Tools Designed To Destroy Tough Malware

imageChoosing and using the right tool, which has been designed specifically for the job at hand, is obviously a levelheaded approach. Still, I’ll wager that you can conjure up more than one occasion when you’ve encountered the “one tool for all purposes” mindset – the so-called “Birmingham Screwdriver” effect – “If it doesn’t work – hit it. If it still doesn’t work, use a bigger hammer.”

The Birmingham Screwdriver approach, taken by many AV solutions, may not always be the most appropriate approach to eradicating a tough malware problem – a specially designed application which targets specific classes of malware may be a better solution.

The following tools have been specifically designed to help skilled users better identify malware infections and then, eradicate (hopefully), those specific infections. These tools require advanced computer knowledge – unless you feel confident in your diagnostic skills, you should avoid them.

Just to be clear – not all of these tools are “one-click simple” to decipher, and users need to be particularly mindful of false positives.

Should you choose to add these applications to your antimalware toolbox, be aware that you will need the latest updated version for maximum impact.

Note: Many of the following tools have been tested and reviewed here previously.

Emsisoft HiJackFree

The program operates as a detailed system analysis tool that can help you in the detection and removal of Hijackers, Spyware, Adware, Trojans, Worms, and other malware. It doesn’t offer live protection but instead, it examines your system, determines if it’s been infected, and then allows you to wipe out the malware.

Runscanner

If you’re a malware hunter, and you’re in the market for a free system utility which will scan your system for running programs, autostart locations, drivers, services and hijack points, then Runscanner should make your shortlist. The developers of Runscanner describe this freeware utility as having been designed to “detect changes and misconfigurations in your system caused by spyware, viruses, or human error.”

HijackThis

HijackThis is a free utility which heuristically scans your computer to find settings that may have been changed by homepage hijackers, spyware, other malware, or even unwanted programs. In addition to this scan and remove capability HijackThis comes with several tools useful in manually removing malware from a computer. The program doesn’t target specific programs, but instead it analyses registry and file settings, and then targets the methods used by cyber-crooks. After you scan your computer, HijackThis creates a report, and a log file (if you choose to do so), with the results of the scan.

RKill

RKill is a program developed at BleepingComputer.com – “It was created so that we could have an easy to use tool that kills known processes that stop the use of our normal anti-malware applications. Simple as that. Nothing fancy. Just kill known malware processes so that anti-malware programs can do their job.”

Emsisoft BlitzBlank

BlitzBlank is a tool for experienced users and all those who must deal with Malware on a daily basis. Malware infections are not always easy to clean up. In more and more cases it is almost impossible to delete a Malware file while Windows is running. BlitzBlank deletes files, Registry entries and drivers at boot time before Windows and all other programs are loaded.

McAfee Labs Stinger

Stinger is a stand-alone utility used to detect and remove specific viruses. It is not a substitute for full anti-virus protection, but rather a tool to assist administrators and users when dealing with an infected system. Stinger utilizes next generation scan engine technology, including process scanning, digitally signed DAT files, and scan performance optimizations.

Specialty Removal Tools From BitDefender

28 special removal tools from Bitdefender.  On the page – click on “Removal Tools”.

Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool

This tool checks your computer for infection by specific, prevalent malicious software (including Blaster, Sasser, and Mydoom) and helps to remove the infection if it is found. Microsoft will release an updated version of this tool on the second Tuesday of each month.

NoVirusThanks

NoVirusThanks Malware Remover is an application designed to detect and remove specific malware, Trojans, worms and other malicious threats that can damage your computer. It can also detect and remove rogue security software, spyware and adware. This program is not an Antivirus and does not protect you in real time, but it can help you to detect and remove Trojans, spywares and rogue security software installed in your computer.

Norton Power Eraser

Symantec describes Norton Power Eraser in part, as a tool that “takes on difficult to detect crimeware known as scareware or rogueware. The Norton Power Eraser is specially designed to aggressively target and eliminate this type of crimeware and restore your PC back to health.”

FreeFixer

FreeFixer is a general purpose removal tool which will help you to delete potentially unwanted software, such as adware, spyware, Trojans, viruses and worms. FreeFixer works by scanning a large number of locations where unwanted software has a known record of appearing or leaving traces. FreeFixer does not know what is good or bad so the scan result will contain both files and settings that you want to keep and perhaps some that you want to remove.

Rootkit Tools:

If you think you might have hidden malware on your system, I recommend that you run multiple rootkit detectors. Much like anti-spyware programs, no one program catches everything.

IceSword

IceSword is a very powerful software application that will scan your computer for rootkits. It also displays hidden processes and resources on your system that you would be unlikely to find in any other Windows Explorer like program. Because of the amount of information presented in the application, please note that IceSword was designed for more advanced users.

GMER

This freeware tool is essentially a combination of Sysinternals’ Rootkit Revealer and Process Explorer. The program can list running processes, modules and Windows services, in addition to scanning for the presence of rootkits.

Special mention 1:

MalwareBytesIn addition to its superb free AV application, MalwareBytes offers a basket full of specialty tools. The following application descriptions have been taken from the site.

Chameleon

Malwarebytes Chameleon technology gets Malwarebytes running when blocked by malicious programs.

Malwarebytes Anti-Rootkit BETA

Malwarebytes Anti-Rootkit removes the latest rootkits.

FileASSASSIN

FileASSASSIN can eradicate any type of locked files from your computer.

RegASSASSIN

RegASSASSIN removes malware-placed registry keys in two simple steps – just reset permissions and delete! This powerful and portable application makes hard-to-remove registry keys a thing of the past.

Special mention 2:

A Rescue Disk (Live CD), which I like to think of as the “SWAT Team” of antimalware solutions – is an important addition to your malware toolbox. More often than not, a Live CD can help you kill malware DEAD!

Avira AntiVir Rescue System – The Avira AntiVir Rescue System a Linux-based application that allows accessing computers that cannot be booted anymore. Thus it is possible to repair a damaged system, to rescue data or to scan the system for virus infections.

Kaspersky Rescue Disk – Boot from the Kaspersky Rescue Disk to scan and remove threats from an infected computer without the risk of infecting other files or computers.

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Filed under Anti-Malware Tools, downloads, Freeware, Geek Software and Tools, Malware Removal, Rootkit Revealers, System Recovery Tools

Comodo IceDragon – A More Secure Firefox?

Comodo IceDragon Browser This is not 1985 when the only thing you had to worry about was what might be on the floppy disks you exchanged with your friends. Today, your Browser is the conduit into your computer – that’s the route by which the majority of malware spreads.

In an age when Internet threats present an ever-evolving, and increasingly sophisticated danger, to a user’s security, privacy, and identity, specialty Internet Browsers like Comodo IceDragon, are becoming much more popular.

Why should this be so – and, what’s the difference between Comodo IceDragon, and regular old Firefox?

First: You’ll notice during the installation process (screen capture shown below), you’ll have the option of choosing Comodo’s secure DNS servers. You may choose to implement this security feature system wide – or, you may choose instead to protect IceDragon only.

There’s not much point in choosing to opt out – since doing so, defeats one of the primary benefits of running with IceDragon.

While the developer points out that you may have potential issues to address, should you choose to run through a VPN – I didn’t experience any problems running through my favorite VPN – TunnelBear – free edition.

Do not be influenced by my choice (as shown below) – choose a setting that reflects your usage pattern.

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FYI: If you’re concerned with DNS security, you do have choices over and above running with a Browser which incorporates a DNS security feature. There are a number of free, beefed-up DNS services – including  Google Public DNS.

Second: Comodo has built into the Browser, it’s Site Inspector – a feature which must be manually launched by clicking on the related Icon, as shown in the following screen capture. My Australian mate Mal C., swears by this feature.

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A quick click (either on a link – or, while on a page), will provide the user with a report as to whether “malicious activity or malware has been detected on the site in question.”

Here’s a shot of a probe on Yahoo.

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So, is this being overplayed – or, is this really an issue?

The very small sample of malicious sites, shown in the following screen shot, should help convince you that it is an issue.

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So, what about my site – how’s it doing?

You’ll note in the screen capture below, that we’re free of malware or malicious activity here. Not surprising, since I use Comodo’s Web Inspector alert as a line of defense to protect this site.

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Third: If you’re a social media site affectionado then, Comodo has you covered with the addition of a social media button. A quick click will launch a log-in page for Facebook, Twitter, or Linkedin (user selectable).

On the face of it, this feature may not seem as if it means very much. But, if it helps stop users from logging in using links contained in emails, for example – then, potentially it has substantial value.

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So, how does it look when compared with a “regular” version of Firefox?

Running with IceDragon – no add-ons or customization – yet.

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My regular Firefox with selected add-ons.

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The options menus appears slightly different that that in Firefox – but, the only noteworthy difference I found was, a user has an additional opportunity to turn on/turn off – the DNS feature as described earlier.

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Additional features:

Fully compatible with Firefox plug-ins and extensions – according to Comodo.

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Fast facts:

Fast, easy to use and light on PC resources

Scan web-pages for malware right from the browser

Lightning fast page loads with integrated DNS service

Privacy and performance enhancements over Firefox core

Full compatibility with Firefox plug-ins

System requirements: Windows 7, Vista, – 32/64 bit. Tested on Windows 8 for this review.

Download at: Comodo

User Guide: Should you need help with CID, check out the online user guide.

You may be are aware that Comodo initially developed a version of Chromium/Chrome (Comodo Dragon), which has essentially the same features as described in this review of IceDragon.

I reviewed that version in February 2010. It’s worth noting, that substantial improvements have been made in the application since that review. Further information on this browser is available at the developer’s site, here.

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Filed under Browsers, Comodo, Don't Get Scammed, Don't Get Hacked, downloads, Freeware

SecurityXploded – A Site Designed For The Geek In You

imageSo much to see – so much to do – and, not enough time. Sort of a synopsis of my experience on the Internet. Not much different from yours, I expect.

Years back, I used to write for Makeuseof.com – a cool site run by a super bunch of people. Despite the income loss – yes, you can make money writing for the Internet – I pulled back on the reins, and resigned as a writer, within a year.

The issue? In a nutshell – not enough time. The time to seek out and develop appropriate content. Not much has changed in that sense – it’s still a chore finding content that appeals to me – which by extension, should appeal to the majority of readers who drop by this site (hopefully   Smile  ).

So, any time a regular reader recommends an application or a web site, one that has proven to be valuable to that reader, I’ll jump on that recommendation. Not only because of the time/work that it saves me – but, what can be better than a recommendation from a reader whom I have come to know, is on top of the game?

A perfect example:

Here, I’ll let regular reader Richard J. explain –

Hello Bill,

I thought that I’d drop you a line about a website that offers a few decent security tools. I’ve only used a few of them – on Windows 7, but there are a few good ones in the list of products available, and they’re free.

Many of them can either be fully installed or else offer a portable version. Most of them work with Windows 8. Personally I’ve chosen to only use the portable versions.

The ones that I’ve found most useful are:

http://securityxploded.com/winservicemanager.php

This one helped me to identify a service that was installed even though I’d removed the associated program.

http://securityxploded.com/streamarmor.php

This one identified one data stream needing analysis but everything else showed up clean! I think that Windows 8 is not supported at least according to the website. This one adds a VirusTotal uploader to your desktop.

http://securityxploded.com/virus-total-scanner.php

This one adds a VirusTotal uploader to your desktop.

I must admit to, not having heard of this site previously – despite the fact that the site is in the top 50,000 sites on the Web. A good example of that “not enough time” thingy.

The site, as it turns out, is similar to Nirsoft  – a site which offers 100+ freeware utilities ranging from Password Tools, Network Monitoring Tools, to System Tools, and more. Utilities and system tools, which I have reviewed individually, and in bulk, any number of times here.

Just like the tools over at Nirsoft, the applications at SecurityXploded are designed to be used by sophisticated users. Since these applications in many cases, dig deep into the operating system, replicating the behavior of hacking tools on the one hand – and malware on the other hand (a number of the recovery utilities are in fact, hacking tools) – you should be prepared for your AV solutions going into overdrive.

From the site:

SecurityXploded is a popular Infosec Research & Development organization offering FREE Security Software, latest Research Articles and FREE Training on Reverse Engineering & Malware Analysis.

So far it has published 50+ research articles and 90+ FREE security software. Most of these software have been listed and received top awards from leading download sites including Softpedia, BrotherSoft etc.

Below, I’ve listed just some (some – so that you don’t have to cursor down all day   Smile   ), of the applications/tools that are available.

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Password Recovery Tools:

AIM Password Decryptor

Asterisk Password Spy

Browser Password Decryptor Updated

Chrome Password Decryptor

Digsby Password Decryptor Updated

Dreamweaver Password Decryptor Updated

Excel Password Recovery

Facebook Password Decryptor

Filezilla Password Decryptor Updated

Fire Master

Fire Master Cracker

Anti-Spyware/Anti-Rootkit Tools:

Advanced Win Service Manager Updated

Dll Hijack Auditor Updated

Exe Scan

Shell Detect

Spy BHO Remover Updated

Spy DLL Remover

Stream Armor

Virus Total Scanner

Network Tools:

Directory Scanner

LDAP Search

Net Database Scanner

Net Share Monitor

System Tools:

Auto Screen Capture

Browser History Spy Updated

Download Hash Verifier Updated

Hash Compare

Hash Generator

All of the tools listed here – and many more – are available for download at the developer’s site: SecurityXploded

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Richard, thank you – I’ve had a super time checking out some of these freebies. I suspect that regular readers will have some fun as well.

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Filed under Computer Tools, downloads, Freeware, Geek Software and Tools

Microsoft Security Essentials – Breaking Up Is Hard To Do – But, It’s Over; You’re Gone

imageSadly, Microsoft Security Essentials and I have had a falling out. We’re through – it’s over – that’s it. It’s broken the cardinal rule I’ve long established for all my applications – trust that it will perform as advertised.

It’s been replaced in my affection by another – one that lives up to its billing –  AVG AntiVirus Free 2013. Microsoft Security Essentials no longer does.

Frankly, I’ve avoided AVG’s products for years – with good cause I think. Applications that are slow, cumbersome, updates that crash systems ….. have a way of ending up in file 13 (the garbage), around here. In the past, AVG’s products were known for all of that, and more. It had its defenders of course, but I was not one of them.

As MSE has slowly lost its touch, AVG has bounded ahead. It’s sleek; it’s fast; it’s free – and, in the latest AV-Test.org’s (see AV-Test.org’s full results here), it pummels MSE – again.

In fact, for the second testing cycle in a row – Microsoft Security Essentials has failed certification as an effective security application.

Quick overview of AVG AntiVirus Free’s salient score points. Click graphic to expand.

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Courtesy – AV-Test.org.

I’ve been running with AVG AntiVirus Free 2013 on a primary home system (a Windows 8 machine), since September 5, of last year. The verdict? I’m impressed – very impressed.

As you can see from the following screen shot, AVG AntiVirus Free offers substantial protection – not quite up to the standard of the company’s paid applications – but, more than enough (in my view), that an aware user should feel comfortable.

Keep in mind, that an educated user understands the limitations of relying on a single security application and, is conversant with the principal of layered security.

Windows 8 users will notice that the GUI (as shown below) owes a little something to Windows 8’s Metro (or whatever MS is calling it these days) GUI.

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Multiple choices are available in the settings menu so that users can tweak and massage the application to meet their specific needs. I must admit – that was a major positive for me.

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Running a scan: As is my practice – I run a complete scan on my machine’s boot drive every day. And a full scan on all attached drives, weekly.

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Running a scan: 60 GB SSD – particulars as shown below.

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Scanning time – just under 5 minutes with “High Priority” set.

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Slip in a USB device – and….

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System requirements: Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP.

Download at: AVG

A Major Bonus – From the site:

It’s not just the software that’s free. So too is phone access to our team of support experts 24/7, 365 days a year (USA, UK, Canada). Kudos to AVG!!

You’ll notice a basket-full of additional free AVG products on the download page – you just might find something that fills a gap in your overall security plan.

Whether you’re an experienced user, or you consider yourself “average”, I recommend that you spend some time scouting around the application’s GUI – there’s lots to be discovered here. All of it good.  Smile

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Filed under 64 Bit Software, Anti-Malware Tools, Antivirus Applications, Don't Get Hacked, downloads, Free Security Programs, Freeware

Sandboxie! – Think INSIDE The Box!

imageWouldn’t it be terrific if, following a mistake which led to malware making its way on to your computer, you could wave a magic wand, utter the words – “get thee gone” – and, quick as you like – no more malware infection?

Luckily, you can do just that. You don’t have to be a mage or a magician – you don’t have to deliver a magic enchantment – but, you do need to be running a sandbox based isolation application.

And that, brings me to Sandboxie (last updated December 16, 2012) – the King of isolation applications in Geek territory. Rather than geek you into the land of nod – today’s review is what I like to refer to as a “soft review”.

Simply put, Sandboxie, when active, creates a virtual environment (of a sort), on a computer by redirecting all system and application changes, to an unused location on a Hard Drive. These changes can be permanently saved to disk or, completely discarded.

A case in point for isolating web surfing:

While surfing the Net, an inexperienced user mistakenly accepts an invitation to install a scareware application but realizes, after the fact, that this is a scam. Operating in a “real” environment, the damage, unfortunately, would already have been done.

Operating in an isolated environment with Sandboxie active; the system changes made by this parasite could be completely discarded – since the attack occurred in a – “I’m not really here” environment .

An obvious part of reviewing an application is, providing a technical breakdown of just how an application gets the job done – or, in some cases how/why an application doesn’t quite get it done.

It’s not often that I get caught between the proverbial “rock and a hard place” in terms of illustrating an application’s aptitude in getting the task accomplished. In this case however, Ronen Tzur, Sandboxie’s developer, has taken the expression – a picture is worth a thousand words – and definitely run with it.

From the site: Introducing Sandboxie

Sandboxie runs your programs in an isolated space which prevents them from making permanent changes to other programs and data in your computer.

The red arrows indicate changes flowing from a running program into your computer. The box labeled Hard disk (no sandbox) shows changes by a program running normally.

The box labeled Hard disk (with sandbox) shows changes by a program running under Sandboxie. The animation illustrates that Sandboxie is able to intercept the changes and isolate them within a sandbox, depicted as a yellow rectangle. It also illustrates that grouping the changes together makes it easy to delete all of them at once.

Fast facts:

Secure Web Browsing: Running your Web browser under the protection of Sandboxie means that all malicious software downloaded by the browser is trapped in the sandbox and can be discarded trivially.

Enhanced Privacy: Browsing history, cookies, and cached temporary files collected while Web browsing stay in the sandbox and don’t leak into Windows.

Secure E-mail: Viruses and other malicious software that might be hiding in your email can’t break out of the sandbox and can’t infect your real system.

Windows Stays Lean: Prevent wear-and-tear in Windows by installing software into an isolated sandbox.

The developer has provided a clear and concise Getting Started tutorial – which includes:

How to to use Sandboxie to run your applications.

How the changes are trapped in the sandbox.

How to recover important files and documents out of the sandbox.

How to delete the sandbox.

System requirements: Windows XP, Vista, Win 7 (32 and 64 bit), Win 8 (32 and 64 bit).

Available languages: English, Albanian, Arabic, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Czech, Danish, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Macedonian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil and Portugal), Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, and Ukrainian.

Download at: Sandboxie

A Caveat: You may run with Sandboxie free of charge – but, once past the initial 30 days, you will be reminded that a lifetime licensed version is available for € 29 (approximately $38 USD at today’s conversion rate).

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Filed under 64 Bit Software, Anti-Malware Tools, Don't Get Hacked, downloads, Malware Protection, Virtualization