Tag Archives: code

Search Engine Results – Not to be Trusted!

It’s been more than a year since I last reported on fake search engine results, and in that time, this Internet scam has not gone away, but it did seem to develop a lower profile.

Despite developing this lower profile, cyber-crooks continued to be unrelenting in their chase to infect web search results. Recently, there has been a resurgence in the use of custom-built Websites designed to drop malicious code on computers, and in the manipulation of legitimate pages in order to infect computers with malware.

A new grouping of 200,000+ compromised sites has been discovered, all of them redirecting to fake security software. The following graphic (courtesy of Cyveillance Blog), shows an attack underway.

image

As is usual with this type of redirection, when a potential victim visits one of these sites the likelihood of the downloading of malicious code onto the computer, by exploiting existing vulnerabilities, is extremely high.

The following graphic (courtesy of Cyveillance Blog), illustrates 260,000 sites, they discovered, which will redirect.

image

Redirection exploit process:

Generally, there are several ways that this can occur. Cyber-crooks can exploit vulnerabilities on the server hosting the web page to insert an iFrame, (an HTML element which makes it possible to embed another HTML document inside the main document). The iFrame can then activate the download of malicious code by exploiting additional vulnerabilities on the visiting machine.

Alternatively, a new web page can be built, with iFrames inserted, that can lead to malware downloads. This new web page appears to be legitimate.

Another method is the insertion of false dialogue boxes, fake toolbars, and more on sites; all designed to load destructive malware which could include rootkits, password stealers, Trojan horses, and spam bots.

It’s often difficult to determine who the cybercriminals responsible for specific attacks of this type are, but not in this case. Researchers have concluded the infamous Koobface gang are responsible.

Regular readers are aware that we repeat the following advice regularly, but it’s worth repeating.

Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched.

Install an Internet Browser add-on that provides protection against questionable or unsafe websites. My personal favorite is WOT (Web of Trust), an Internet Explorer/FireFox add-on that offers substantial protection against questionable or unsafe websites.

Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use.

Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible.

Disable scripting features in email programs.

Make regular backups of critical data.

Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised.

Turn off file and printer sharing on the computer.

Install a personal firewall on the computer.

Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet.

Ensure the anti-virus software scans all e-mail attachments.

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7 Comments

Filed under Browser add-ons, Don't Get Scammed, Don't Get Hacked, Firefox Add-ons, Internet Explorer Add-ons, Internet Security Alerts, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Rogue Software, scareware, System Security, Windows Tips and Tools

I’m a Pop-up Download and I Gotcha!

Being unaware can cause havoc on your computer.

image Your Firewall and Security Applications provide the ultimate in protection while you’re surfing the web, right? Well in a sense, they do.

Paradoxically, it’s because current anti-malware solutions are much more effective than they have ever been in detecting worms and viruses, that we’re now faced with another insidious form of attack.

Drive-by downloads are not new; they’ve been lurking around for years it seems, but they’ve become much more common and more crafty recently. The latest twist on this is the so called “pop-up download”.

If you’re unfamiliar with the term, “drive-by download”, they are essentially programs that are automatically downloaded and installed on your computer without your knowledge. This action can occur while visiting an infected web site, opening an infected HTML email, or by clicking on the newest threat, a deceptive popup window – the so called “pop-up download”.

For example, when visiting a site, a user might receive a pop-up box that appears as an offer to download an application. The user is then asked to accept the download despite the fact no application name is offered.

Unfortunately, a typical computer user is generally undereducated in the Internet safety issues that apply in this type of scenario. Clicking “yes”, will lead to the automatic installation of an application – in many cases, an unknown application.

Popups 2

Often, more than one program is downloaded. For example, file sharing with tracking spyware is very common. Again, it’s important to remember that this can take place without warning, or your approval.

Apparently, there are now some legitimate application developers who are using this “pop-up download” method to distribute, or advertise their product. Just last night, I had an advertising popup appear on my screen from PC Tools ThreatFire, something that has not happened in the 2 years I have been using this application. Needless to say I was shocked, offended and extremely annoyed.

For more information on how to prevent popups from occurring at the Browser level, checkout “How to block ads (updated), ” at Tech – for Everyone.

Additional steps you can take to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim?

The following are actions (familiar to regular readers of this site), that you can take to protect your computer system:

  • When surfing the web – Stop. Think. Click
  • Don’t open unknown email attachments
  • Don’t run programs of unknown origin
  • Disable hidden filename extensions
  • Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched
  • Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use
  • Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible
  • Disable scripting features in email programs
  • Make regular backups of critical data
  • Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised
  • Turn off file and printer sharing on your computer.
  • Install a personal firewall on your computer.
  • Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet
  • Ensure the anti-virus software scans all email attachments

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

I recommend that you ensure that the current anti- malware applications, which you depend on to protect your system, are up to the task by reading “The 35 Best Free Applications” on this site.

If you missed “Rogue Security Software on the Rise – What You Need to Know Now!”, you can read it on this site.

2 Comments

Filed under Adware, Don't Get Hacked, Freeware, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, Malware Advisories, System Security, Windows Tips and Tools

Windows Patch Tuesday – April 2009

Microsoft released 8 security bulletins on Tuesday (April 14, 2009) to fix remote code execution and denial of service vulnerabilities.

windows_generic_v_web We have always recommended, on this site, that users ensure that Windows Automatic Update is enabled as a major step in maximizing operating system security.

It is not an overstatement to say; an unpatched Windows system is an invitation to disaster.

If you have updates enabled, patches will be downloaded routinely. Careful users will verify that patches, have, in fact, been applied.

If Windows Automatic Update is not enabled on your system, then you should logon to the MS update site and download and apply these patches immediately.

Vulnerability issues and the corresponding patches:

MS09-010/KB923561 – Important (XP, 2000, 2003): There are four bugs (two previously disclosed publically, two previously undisclosed) that affect a variety of word processing documents, that can allow remote code execution exploits to occur.

MS09-011/KB961373 – Critical (XP, 2000, 2003): This patch closes a hole that let attackers execute a remote code execution attack through MJPEG files; the bug is in DirectX 8.1 and 9.0x.

MS09-012/KB952004/KB956572 – Important (XP, Vista, 2000, 2003, 2008): This patch resolves four holes in Windows that have already been publically disclosed. The hole allows an attacker who is already logged onto the system to escalate their privileges and take full control of the system.

MS09-013/KB960803 – Critical (XP, Vista, 2000, 2003, 2008): This patch addresses three bugs in the Windows HTTP Services system; one of them allows remote code execution which allows an attacker to completely own a system. This is a “must patch” item for all Windows systems.

MS09-014/KB963027 – Critical (XP, Vista, 2000)/Important (2000, 2003): This is a cumulative security update for Internet Explorer 5, 6, and 7. Some of the fixes address already public bugs, some deal with privately disclosed exploits. You should install this patch immediately. Users with IE8 do not need this patch.

MS09-015/KB959426 – Moderate (XP, Vista, 2003, 2008)/Low (2000): This patch takes care of a problem with the Windows Search Path function that could enable an escalation of privileges.

6 Comments

Filed under Application Vulnerabilities, Don't Get Hacked, Malware Advisories, Microsoft Patch Tuesday, Spyware - Adware Protection, Windows Tips and Tools

Pop-up Downloads – They Get You Coming and Going

Being unaware can cause havoc on your computer.

dumb5 Your Firewall and Security Applications provide the ultimate in protection while you’re surfing the web, right? Well in a sense, they do.

Paradoxically, it’s because current anti-malware solutions are much more effective than they have ever been in detecting worms and viruses, that we’re now faced with another insidious form of attack.

Drive-by downloads are not new; they’ve been lurking around for years it seems, but they’ve become much more common and more crafty recently. The latest twist on this is the so called “pop-up download”.

If you’re unfamiliar with the term, “drive-by download”, they are essentially programs that are automatically downloaded and installed on your computer without your knowledge. This action can occur while visiting an infected web site, opening an infected HTML email, or by clicking on the newest threat, a deceptive popup window – the so called “pop-up download”.

For example, when visiting a site, a user might receive a pop-up box that appears as an offer to download an application. The user is then asked to accept the download despite the fact no application name is offered.

Unfortunately, a typical computer user is generally undereducated in the Internet safety issues that apply in this type of scenario. Clicking “yes”, will lead to the automatic installation of an application – an unknown application.

Popups 2

Often, more than one program is downloaded. For example, file sharing with tracking spyware is very common. Again, it’s important to remember that this can take place without warning, or your approval. Apparently, there are some legitimate application developers who are using this “pop-up download” method to distribute their product.

I find it galling that more so called Internet security analysts have not taken a harder line on this deceptive marketing technique. Is it any wonder the economy is in the tank, when for 20+ years the economy has been based on fraud, and deceptive and illegal practices? When are we going to learn to speak out against this type of nonsense?

What can you do to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim?

The following are actions (familiar to regular readers of this site), that you can take to protect your computer system:

  • When surfing the web – Stop. Think. Click
  • Don’t open unknown email attachments
  • Don’t run programs of unknown origin
  • Disable hidden filename extensions
  • Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched
  • Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use
  • Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible
  • Disable scripting features in email programs
  • Make regular backups of critical data
  • Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised
  • Turn off file and printer sharing on your computer.
  • Install a personal firewall on your computer.
  • Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet
  • Ensure the anti-virus software scans all email attachments

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

I recommend that you ensure that the current anti- malware applications, which you depend on to protect your system, are up to the task by reading “The 35 Best Free Applications” on this site.

If you missed “Rogue Security Software on the Rise – What You Need to Know Now!”, you can read it on this site.

4 Comments

Filed under Adware, Don't Get Hacked, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, internet scams, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Rogue Software, Spyware - Adware Protection, System Security, Windows Tips and Tools

Google – Get Off Your Collective Butts and Fix The Problem!

google-logo Internet security is a “sexy” business – one gets to work in the “dark side” of the Internet and is constantly challenged to stay ahead of the learning curve, develop new techniques, appliances and applications to protect Web sites, and attached devices and systems, from hackers, cyber-crooks, malware and while understated, terrorists.

Failure to protect the Internet, which by definition is an open network, has substantial penalties ranging from productivity decreases, infrastructure compromise, to a failure in consumer confidence and more. It’s this last one – a failure in consumer confidence that is the focus of this article.

In dealing with Internet security issues, I’m often frustratingly reminded of the “head in the sand syndrome” – if we ignore it will go away, if we ignore it then it can’t be real, if we ignore it will get better, anon. It’s no surprise then that a substantial security issue, well known to Google, which has failed to come up with an effective solution, continues to plague the Internet.

Those of us who are involved in Internet security know, and have known for a considerable time, that cyber-crooks are unrelenting in their chase to infect web search results. We know that there has been a steady increase in the use of custom-built Websites designed to drop malicious code on computers, and in the manipulation of legitimate pages in order to infect computers with malware.

For example, until quite recently (less than 3 weeks ago), a user searching for the following string on Google “Microsoft Office 2002 download” would have encountered a Microsoft.com redirection link as the first result. That link had been redirecting visitors to a malicious web site, that then launched a malware attack which included an attempt to convince victims to download rogue security software. Microsoft has since fixed the problem.

Equally as disturbing, seventy nine percent of compromised web pages tracked in the last year were on legitimate web sites; including web sites belonging to Fortune 500 companies, government agencies and ironically, security vendors.

google_adwords_machine

If one were to poll a group of typical Internet users as to the safety and reliability of search engine results there is little doubt that the answer would be positive. Given that search engine results can be manipulated in the ways described above, and other ways, it is reasonable to ask the question – why aren’t typical Internet users aware of this situation.

Arguably, a case could be made that Google and others subscribe to the “head in the sand syndrome” – if we ignore it will go away, if we ignore it then it can’t be real, if we ignore it will get better, since to acknowledge this issue, and to give it the focus it deserves, would erode consumer confidence in the product. Good corporate thinking, huh?

Here’s a sample of what Internet users are facing, posted on the Internet just today, January 16, 2009:

“I’m the owner of the site http://www.xxxxxx.net. When anyone searches Google for our firm, the first result looks like the link to our site. But when anyone clicks on that result they get redirected to an alarming site that tries to sell fake spam software. The hijack site takes control of the browser! This is happening when our potential clients search for us! Help! If I type the address directly into my browser then it works fine. I submitted a spam report to Google a couple of days ago, but nothing has changed yet”.

So how do the crooks do it?

Common techniques used by cyber-criminals include the manipulation of search engine results, and the seeding of fake Websites among the top results returned by these engines. When a potential victim visits one of these sites (as described above), the likelihood of the downloading of malicious code onto the computer, by exploiting existing vulnerabilities, is extremely high.

There are several ways that this can occur. Cyber-crooks can exploit vulnerabilities on the server hosting the web page to insert an iFrame, (an HTML element which makes it possible to embed another HTML document inside the main document). The iFrame can then activate the download of malicious code by exploiting additional vulnerabilities on the visiting machine.

Alternatively, a new web page can be built, with iFrames inserted, that can lead to malware downloads. This new web page appears to be legitimate.

An additional method, employed by cyber-crooks is the insertion of false dialogue boxes, fake toolbars, and more on sites; all designed to load destructive malware which could include rootkits, password stealers, Trojan horses, and spam bots.

So will Google address this issue? Sure, but only when malicious hackers finally force them to. Great business model Google!

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

Checkout Need Free Security Programs? – 10 Of The Best! on this site

3 Comments

Filed under Anti-Malware Tools, Don't Get Hacked, Google, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Rogue Software, Safe Surfing, System Security, trojans, Viruses, worms

Massive Patch Tuesday – 28 Vulnerabilities Patched

There are currently 28 vulnerabilities in unpatched Microsoft Windows, Internet Explorer and Microsoft Office, that could allow cyber-criminals to launch malicious attacks on your computer.

On Patch Tuesday, December 9, 2008, Microsoft released security patches to address these issues.

Vulnerability issues and the corresponding patches:

MS08-070 (critical; 6 vulnerabilities fixed): This update resolves five privately reported vulnerabilities and one publicly disclosed vulnerability in Visual Basic 6.0 Runtime Extended Files (ActiveX Controls), which could allow remote code execution if a user browsed a Web site that contains specially crafted content.

MS08-071 (critical; 2 vulnerabilities fixed): This update resolves two privately reported vulnerability in Windows, which could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted WMF image file.

MS08-072 (critical; 8 vulnerabilities): This update resolves eight privately reported vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office, which could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted Word or Rich Text Format (RTF) file.

MS08-073 (critical; 4 vulnerabilities fixed): This update resolves four privately reported vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer, which could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially crafted Web page using Internet Explorer.

MS08-074 (critical; 3 vulnerabilities): This update resolves three privately reported vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office, which could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted Excel file.

MS08-075 (critical; 2 vulnerabilities): This update resolves two privately reported vulnerabilities in Windows, which could allow remote code execution if a user opens and saves a specially crafted saved-search file within Windows Explorer or if a user clicks a specially crafted search URL.

MS08-076 (important; 2 vulnerabilities): This update resolves two privately reported vulnerabilities in Windows, which could allow remote code execution.

MS08-077 (important; 1 vulnerability): This update resolves one privately reported vulnerability in Microsoft Office SharePoint, which could allow elevation of privilege if an attacker bypasses authentication by browsing to an administrative URL on a SharePoint site. A successful attack could result in denial of service or information disclosure.

It is not an overstatement to say; an unpatched Windows system is an invitation to disaster. If you have Windows Update turned on you’re covered, if not, I highly recommend that you download manually immediately.

Updated December 12, 2008:

The details being published about this weeks IE 0-day is incorrect and
insufficient to protect users, read more:
http://secunia.com/blog/38/

The updated Secunia Advisory is available here:
http://secunia.com/advisories/33089/

1 Comment

Filed under Application Vulnerabilities, Don't Get Hacked, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, Malware Advisories, Microsoft Patch Tuesday, Spyware - Adware Protection, Windows Tips and Tools

Drive-by Downloads – Update Your Browser Right Now!

Your Firewall and Security Applications along with your Browser security add-ons provide the ultimate in protection while you’re surfing the web, right? Well in a sense they do.

Paradoxically, it’s because current anti-malware solutions are marginally more effective than they have ever been in detecting worms and viruses, that we’re now faced with another insidious form of attack.

Drive-by downloads are not new; they’ve been lurking around for years it seems, but they’ve become much more common and more crafty recently.

More than three million unique URLs on over 180,000 websites are automatically installing malware via drive-by downloads, according to recent statements by the Google Anti-Malware Team.

Google has not been alone in noticing this trend by cyber-criminals using these techniques. According to IBM cyber-criminals are directly attacking web browsers in order to steal identities, gain access to online accounts and conduct other criminal activities.

If you’re unfamiliar with the term, drive-by download, they are essentially programs that automatically download and installed on your computer without your knowledge. This action can occur while visiting an infected web site, opening an infected HTML email, or by clicking on a deceptive popup window.

Drive-by downloads work by targeting Internet browser vulnerabilities to download and run malware automatically when a user visits the site. Don’t think that by staying away from dangerous website such as adult sites that you’re any safer. The fact is these infected websites are all over the Internet.

Often more than one program is downloaded, for example, file sharing with tracking spyware is very common. Again, it’s important to remember that this can take place without warning, or your approval.

Recent statistics seem to indicate that 40% of frequent Internet users continue to use an outdated version of their current Internet browser. Statistics generated from my own Blog stats put this figure at 31%. These users’ are essentially already victims just waiting to be victimized again.

Do you want to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim? Then there is a really easy way to do that – update your browser to the latest version now. Right now!

While all Internet browsers can be subject to vulnerabilities, the free FireFox browser from Mozilla is the browser of choice for most security conscious users, and is preferred by those who tend to think “Geeky”, due to the amazing number of add-ons that increase safety and functionality.

Download FireFox here.

You need to be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security by making sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

If you missed “Rogue Security Software on the Rise – What You Need to Know Now!” you can read it here.

For a different take on Google’s new browser checkout TechPaul’s “A Real Life Review of Google’s New Browser”.

3 Comments

Filed under Application Vulnerabilities, Browsers, Firefox, Freeware, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Safe Surfing, System Security, Windows Tips and Tools

Fake/Redirected Search Results – Consequences for You

I hate being victimized! Unfortunately, all of us who use the Internet can be victimized in ways that sometimes defy credibility. Ironically, even those of us who specialize in Internet security can be targeted by cyber-criminals.

Several weeks ago, one of my Blog sites was the target of redirected search engine results. Essentially, what had been happening is this – when a search was made by a web user which produced a result listing my site, and the user clicked on that link, in some circumstances, the user was redirected to a site, or page, controlled by a hijacker.

While this exploit didn’t impact me financially, since I don’t run ads on my sites, it was disappointing knowing that cyber-criminals were potentially benefiting economically from the results of my efforts. Very often, the purpose behind this type of attack is the hacker’s need to increase his site’s reputation on Google, and other search engines, by fraudulently increasing the site’s hits. This can lead to an increase in profits generated by that site.

The dangers to you:

Those of us who are involved in Internet security know – cyber-crooks are unrelenting in their chase to infect web search results. We know that there has been a steady increase in the use of custom-built Websites designed to drop malicious code on computers, and in the manipulation of legitimate pages in order to infect computers with malware.

Earlier today, I read on the Darkreading Website, a security site for IT professionals, “that hackers have launched a multi-faceted attack on the Website of the popular AARP organization, rerouting traffic from the seniors’ association to pornography sites”. A bit chancy, I would have thought.

Other common techniques used by these cyber-criminals include the manipulation of search engine results, and the seeding of Websites among the top results returned by these engines. When a potential victim visits one of these sites the likelihood of the downloading of malicious code onto the computer, by exploiting existing vulnerabilities, is extremely high.

There are several ways that this can occur. Cyber-crooks can exploit vulnerabilities on the server hosting the web page to insert an iFrame, (an HTML element which makes it possible to embed another HTML document inside the main document). The iFrame can then activate the download of malicious code by exploiting additional vulnerabilities on the visiting machine.

Alternatively, a new web page can be built, with iFrames inserted, that can lead to malware downloads. This new web page appears to be legitimate.

Another method is the insertion of false dialogue boxes, fake toolbars, and more on sites; all designed to load destructive malware which could include rootkits, password stealers, Trojan horses, and spam bots.

So what can you do to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim?

Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched.

Install an Internet Browser add-on that provides protection against questionable or unsafe websites. My personal favorite is WOT (Web of Trust), an Internet Explorer/FireFox add-on that offers substantial protection against questionable or unsafe websites.

Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use.

Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible.

Disable scripting features in email programs.

Make regular backups of critical data.

Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised.

Turn off file and printer sharing on the computer.

Install a personal firewall on the computer.

Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet.

Ensure the anti-virus software scans all e-mail attachments.

5 Comments

Filed under Browsers, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, Internet Safety Tools, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Search Engines, Spyware - Adware Protection, trojans, Viruses, Windows Tips and Tools

Drive-by Downloads – The Paradox Created by Firewalls/Security Applications

Your Firewall and Security Applications provide the ultimate in protection while you’re surfing the web, right? Well in a sense they do.

Paradoxically, it’s because current anti-malware solutions are much more effective than they have ever been in detecting worms and viruses, that we’re now faced with another insidious form of attack.

Drive-by downloads are not new; they’ve been lurking around for years it seems, but they’ve become much more common and more crafty recently.

More than three million unique URLs on over 180,000 websites are automatically installing malware via drive-by downloads, according to recent statements by the Google Anti-Malware Team. Google has not been alone in noticing this trend by criminal hackers using these techniques. IBM noted recently, that criminals are directly attacking web browsers in order to steal identities, gain access to online accounts and conduct other illicit activities.

If you’re unfamiliar with the term, drive-by download, they are essentially programs that automatically download and installed on your computer without your knowledge. This action can occur while visiting an infected web site, as previously noted, opening an infected HTML email, or by clicking on a deceptive popup window. Often more than one program is downloaded, for example, file sharing with tracking spyware is very common. Again, it’s important to remember that this can take place without warning, or your approval.

What can you do to ensure you are protected, or to reduce the chances you will become a victim?

The following are actions you can take to protect your computer system:

  • When surfing the web: Stop. Think. Click
  • Don’t open unknown email attachments
  • Don’t run programs of unknown origin
  • Disable hidden filename extensions
  • Keep all applications (including your operating system) patched
  • Turn off your computer or disconnect from the network when not in use
  • Disable Java, JavaScript, and ActiveX if possible
  • Disable scripting features in email programs
  • Make regular backups of critical data
  • Make a boot disk in case your computer is damaged or compromised
  • Turn off file and printer sharing on the computer.
  • Install a personal firewall on the computer.
  • Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and ensure it is configured to automatically update when you are connected to the Internet
  • Ensure the anti-virus software scans all e-mail attachments
  • Install McAfee Site Advisor, WOT, or a similar browser add-on

Be proactive when it comes to your computer’s security; make sure you have adequate software based protection to reduce the chances that your machine will become infected.

If you missed “Rogue Security Software on the Rise – What You Need to Know Now!” you can read it here.

4 Comments

Filed under Browsers, Email, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, internet scams, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Rogue Software, rootkits, Safe Surfing, Spyware - Adware Protection, Windows Tips and Tools