Tag Archives: cell

Benefits of a Wired Life

Wired life Over the last ten to fifteen years, we have seen an explosive amount of growth related to high technology.

In just a few short years, we have gone from land lines and dial-up internet connections to 3g cell phones and wireless internet.

Living in this period of time is exciting for many different reasons and living a wired life has many benefits, a few of which will be explored in the following article.

Instant Access to Information

Whenever you need to find something out in this day and age, all you need to do is go to Google and you will have the answer in a matter of seconds. This is great for many different reasons. There is rarely a need to dial information, and when you look up something on the internet, you also can see reviews, updated information, and alternatives to your search as well, regardless of what you’re looking for.

Get Anywhere with Ease

Whether you utilize the Google Maps tool or have a GPS system in your vehicle, chances are you’ll have a tough time getting lost on the way to a new location. Although there have been some instances where this technology hasn’t been quite as effective, it is generally the best information available out there at the moment. Glitches have basically been worked out and maps are updated frequently as new routes are assessed and opened up.

Mobility

mobility Practically everything you could ever need in the way of technology is now available in a portable device.

In 1998, the average hard drive on a PC was 8 GB; now an 80 GB mp3 player is smaller than a deck of cards. In such a brief time period, practically everything is now portable.

Pocket PCs and cell phones have access to a variety of function that go far beyond the bulky cell phone of ten to twelve years ago. The ability to access your PC’s desktop from a remote location is another of many benefits of the increasingly mobile nature of technology.

Promise of Greatness to Come

Each time a new technology is developed, it brings a sense of hope for what the future has in store. Even now, documents and records are being scanned and backed up, books are being saved to digital formats, and databases are being created to be able to make the most of our technology. As this field continues to grow and develop, our lives can and will only get better as a result.

By-line:

This article was contributed by Holly McCarthy, who writes on the subject of an internet provider. She invites your feedback at hollymccarthy12 (at) gmail dot com

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Filed under Interconnectivity, Living Life, Networking, Personal Perspective, social networking, Windows Tips and Tools

Cell Phone Fraud – Cyber Criminals New Scam

According to the Internet Crime Complaint Center, a partnership between the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the U.S. National White Collar Crime Center, cell phone fraud attacks are on the rise.

Given the unsteady state of world economies, a near perfect opportunity has been created for cyber-crooks to take advantage of people’s fears, and the worries, created by the uncertainties surrounding this crisis. Not surprisingly, there has been a major increase in financial-themed phishing, vishing, and spam.

Yes, you’ve heard of phishing, but what’s this vishing you ask?

The IC³ (Internet Crime Complaint Center) describes vishing as an attempt to persuade consumers either by email, text message, or a telephone call, purportedly from their credit card/debit card company, to divulge their Personally Identifiable Information (PII), claiming their account has been suspended, deactivated, or terminated.

In a common scenario, recipients are asked to contact their bank by calling a telephone number provided in the e-mail, cell phone text message, or alternatively, by an automated telephone recording. When the potential victim calls the telephone number, they are greeted with “Welcome to the bank of …” and then requested to enter their card number in order to resolve a pending security issue.

In the email scam attempt, in order to persuade the recipient that it is not a scam, the fraudulent e-mail sets out all the caveats the potential victim should be aware of in dealing with this type of email.

Who would consider that a scam artist would warn you that a bank would not contact customers to obtain their Personally Identifiable Information by e-mail, mail, text message or instant messenger?

To further convince the recipient of the validity of the email, it goes on to state that the recipients should not provide sensitive information when requested in an e-mail, and not to click on embedded links, claiming they could contain “malicious software aimed at capturing login credentials.”

Would this convince you that this email was genuine? It just might.

A new version of this scam recently reported to IC³ involves the sending of text messages to cell phones claiming the recipient’s on-line bank account has expired. The message instructs the recipient to renew their on-line bank account by using the link provided.

These types of attacks against financial institutions, and consumers, are occurring with such frequency that IC³ has called the situation “alarming”.

To reduce the chances of being victimized the following are minimum safety precautions you should take:

Consider every email, telephone call, or text message requesting your Personally Identifiable Information as a scam

Never click on embedded email or cell phone links

When contacting your bank; use a telephone number from your statement, a telephone book, or another independent source

You can read more on this issue at the Internet Crime Complaint Center.

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Filed under Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, internet scams, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Phishing, Windows Tips and Tools

Cell Phone Fraud – Protect Yourself from Vishing

According to the Internet Crime Complaint Center, a partnership between the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the U.S. National White Collar Crime Center, Vishing attacks are on the increase.

Yes, you’ve heard of Phishing, but what’s this Vishing you ask?

The IC³ (Internet Crime Complaint Center) describes Vishing as an attempt to persuade consumers either by email, text message, or a telephone call, purportedly from their credit card/debit card company, to divulge their Personally Identifiable Information (PII), claiming their account was suspended, deactivated, or terminated.

In one scenario, recipients are asked to contact their bank by calling a telephone number provided in the e-mail, or alternatively, by an automated telephone recording. When the potential victim calls the telephone number, they’re greeted with “Welcome to the bank of …” and then requested to enter their card number in order to resolve a pending security issue.

In the email scam attempt, in order to persuade the recipient that it is not a scam, the fraudulent e-mail sets out all the caveats the potential victim should be aware of in dealing with this type of email. Who would consider that a scam artist would warn you that a bank would not contact customers to obtain their PII by e-mail, mail, and instant messenger?

To further convince the recipient of the validity of the email, it goes on to state that the recipients should not provide sensitive information when requested in an e-mail, and not to click on embedded links, claiming they could contain “malicious software aimed at capturing login credentials.”

Would this convince you that this email was genuine? It just might.

A new version of this scam recently reported to IC³ involves the sending of text messages to cell phones claiming the recipient’s on-line bank account has expired. The message instructs the recipient to renew their on-line bank account by using the link provided.

These types of attacks against financial institutions, and consumers, are occurring with such frequency that IC³ has called the situation “alarming”.

Minimum safety precautions you should take.

Consider every email, telephone call, or text message requesting your PII as a scam.

Never click on embedded email or cell phone links.

When contacting your bank; use a telephone number from your statement, a telephone book, or another independent source.

You can read more on this issue at the Internet Crime Complaint Center.

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Filed under Email, Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, internet scams, Malware Advisories, Online Safety, Windows Tips and Tools

Internet/Cell Phone Fraud – Vishing, Cyber Criminals New Scam

According to the Internet Crime Complaint Center, a partnership between the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the U.S. National White Collar Crime Center, Vishing attacks are on the increase.

Yes, you’ve heard of Phishing, but what’s this Vishing you ask?

The IC³ (Internet Crime Complaint Center) describes Vishing as an attempt to persuade consumers either by email, text message, or a telephone call, purportedly from their credit card/debit card company, to divulge their Personally Identifiable Information (PII), claiming their account was suspended, deactivated, or terminated.

In one scenario, recipients are asked to contact their bank by calling a telephone number provided in the e-mail, or alternatively, by an automated telephone recording. When the potential victim calls the telephone number, they’re greeted with “Welcome to the bank of …” and then requested to enter their card number in order to resolve a pending security issue.

In the email scam attempt, in order to persuade the recipient that it is not a scam, the fraudulent e-mail sets out all the caveats the potential victim should be aware of in dealing with this type of email. Who would consider that a scam artist would warn you that a bank would not contact customers to obtain their PII by e-mail, mail, and instant messenger?

To further convince the recipient of the validity of the email, it goes on to state that the recipients should not provide sensitive information when requested in an e-mail, and not to click on embedded links, claiming they could contain “malicious software aimed at capturing login credentials.”

Would this convince you that this email was genuine? It just might.

A new version of this scam recently reported to IC³ involves the sending of text messages to cell phones claiming the recipient’s on-line bank account has expired. The message instructs the recipient to renew their on-line bank account by using the link provided.

These types of attacks against financial institutions, and consumers, are occurring with such frequency that IC³ has called the situation “alarming”.

Minimum safety precautions you should take.

  • Consider every email, telephone call, or text message requesting your PII as a scam
  • Never click on embedded email or cell phone links
  • When contacting your bank; use a telephone number from your statement, a telephone book, or another independent source

You can read more on this issue at the Internet Crime Complaint Center.

3 Comments

Filed under Interconnectivity, Internet Safety, internet scams, Online Banking, Online Safety, Phishing, Privacy, Uncategorized, Windows Tips and Tools