Category Archives: System Memory Management

Tackle One of the Top PC Performance Killers: Low Disk Space

In this article, guest writer Tibor Schiemann, President and Managing Partner of software developer TuneUp, (the TuneUp Utilities 2011 folks), takes the mystery out of why low disk space can slow your computer to a crawl.

imageNo matter how fast your PC is, low disk space can slow any computer down, especially newer ones with fast, solid-state drives (SSDs). In fact, low disk space is typically the #1 reason for a sluggish machine, and one that is even overlooked by IT pros. In order to tackle this issue, it’s first important to understand why low disk space significantly slows down programs, affects SSD drives, increases load times and causes dozens of error messages.

Windows and most third-party programs need disk space to breath. Windows, for example, needs space for its paging file, which extends a PC’s physical memory (RAM) in case it runs out. When there is low disk space, the paging file can’t grow when required and impacts PC performance. Low disk space can also reduce SSDs’ speed, as it requires these flash-based disks to read single data cells into memory before writing new data. This will even crash read/write performance.

Depending on its demand, the paging file dynamically increases and decreases in size. Imagine if your PC’s disk space were to fall below the 500 to 1000 MB limit. Once the paging file tries to increase and hits the disk space limit, you can expect terrible performance, and your system will most likely crash.

Windows isn’t the only system depending on at least a couple GB of free disk space; many applications create files to store data temporarily. PhotoShop, for example, is known to create a “scratch disk” when running. This disk has a dynamic size ranging from a couple of hundred MBs to several GBs. Expect PhotoShop, or any other application for that matter, to run poorly or not at all once this temporary file takes up the rest of your hard disk limit.

Unfortunately, this problem persists on modern machines as well. Take a netbook, a low-budget notebook or even a high-end machine with an SSD drive. Your music libraries or even stored photos might just be enough to hit the limit quickly—add the regular size of a typical Windows installation (20 GB) and applications, and you’re working at the limit of their disk’s capacity.

Of course, I wanted to test this theory to make sure that low disk space is, in fact, a serious performance threat. For the tests, I used an Intel Penryn C2D with 3 GHz, 4 GB of RAM and an SSD. In order to run low on disk space, I simply duplicated a couple of files that were several hundred MB until I hit the disk space limit.

Surprisingly, once my disk space sank below the dangerous 100 MB mark, the PC didn’t suffer. This is probably due to the fact that both my RAM and the default paging file compensated for the current memory need. However, things got shaky once I started to work more heavily. Programs and applications suddenly wouldn’t start, and those I was currently running didn’t react. For example, iTunes didn’t respond to any clicks—it froze yet kept playing music in the background.

And the PC’s performance continued to take a turn for the worse when I maxed out disk space. The boot procedure took more than twice as long, according to XPerf from MicrosoftsWindowsPerformanceToolkit. Since many of my regular programs refused to launch, I couldn’t benchmark the start-up times for many applications. After trying Outlook, PhotoShop, Indesign and even Live Messenger, I was finally able to get Internet Explorer 9 to launch. But, time basically stood still the moment I clicked on the web browser icon—nothing happened. After about 13 seconds, the web browser appeared on the screen and started to load a website, and that was all I could do—the system was unusable.

Given my test results, low disk space is certainly a performance killer. Luckily, there are several tips to follow that can help you quickly rescue your system from low disk space. First, TuneUpUtilities 2011’s Gain Disk Space feature can be used to remove unnecessary files and old backups, while TuneUp Disk Space Explorer can help you find huge data hogs. It’s also helpful to do some routine maintenance and use Microsoft’s Windows Disk Cleanup tool. Additionally, uninstall unnecessary Windows features and remove large programs that you no longer need to free up your machine’s disk space. This “FiveWaystoGetRidofDataClutter” blog post provides step-by-step instructions on how to implement these tips.

It’s important to keep a close eye on the amount of free disk space your computer has. When disk space starts running low, make sure to take the necessary steps to improve performance and get your machine back up and running again in no time.

For additional tips and tricks on maintaining PC performance, I invite you to visit the TuneUp Blog about Windows (http://blog.tuneup.com).

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Filed under Computer Maintenance, Computer Tune Up Utilities, Guest Writers, Hard Drive Maintenance, Integrated Tune Up Solutions, Software, System Memory Management, System Utilities, TuneUp Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools

Older Computer? Insufficient Memory? Try FreeRAM XP Pro

imageThe phrase “snake oil”, gets bandied about most frequently in the tech world it seems to me, when it comes to two classes of applications – Registry Cleaners, and Memory Managers. In both cases, I’ll concede that it’s probably a fair description.

But, (there’s that “but” again), in some cases, the use of an aggressive Registry Cleaner such as RegSeeker may be called for, and, there are a number of  Memory Managers that can improve system response given the right parameters.

Yes, I’ve heard all the naysayers and their arguments that memory management and optimization applications, are not effective. I don’t necessarily agree. Sure, if you have 2/3/4, GB of Ram you don’t need to manage your memory in this way.

However, a fair number of users that I deal with on a personal level, run Windows XP on a 3 or 4 year old box, with 1 GB of RAM or less – they do not run Windows 7 with 2/3/4 GB of Ram. This is “real world” computing, not the “esoteric world” of computing that many techies live in, where the assumption seems to be, all users run a quad core with appropriate memory. It just ain’t so!

This review is based on years of experience with this application, and not a ten minute “let’s see what you can do” test, as is far too often the case with software reviews. On this site, nothing gets written up without a minimum two week, or longer, test period.

One of my test platforms is an older Dell running Windows XP Pro with 512 MB of RAM, which gets a heavy workout on a daily basis, and has for years. And, the free Memory Manager, FreeRAM XP Pro, has been an integral part of this system for most of that time, and has worked flawlessly in balancing and releasing memory as required.

FreeRAM XP Pro includes automatic memory monitoring and optimization, advanced tray support, fast, threaded freeing with a stop option, multiple system-metric monitors, a simple and attractive GUI, memory reporting and diagnostic logging, and real-time memory information.

The program’s AutoFree feature intelligently scales how much RAM is freed with your current system status, so that RAM is optimized without slowing down your computer.

FreeRAM XP Pro has been designed to be easy to use, yet highly customizable by computer novices and experts alike.

Fast facts:

Downloaded over 6 million times from CNET alone

Automatic, real-time memory monitoring and optimization

Fast, threaded memory freeing with stop option

AutoFree option intelligently optimizes RAM without sacrificing performance

System metric and performance monitors

Advanced tray support

Memory reporting and diagnostic logging

Simple, attractive interface

RAM-cuts (RAM-freeing Windows shortcuts)

Customizable Windows hotkey support

Access to Windows memory-related tweaks that could enhance system performance

Process memory usage reporting

Unique memory compression technology directly reduces applications’ “working set” memory requirements instantly and without swap file usage: completely unlike other memory programs

System requirements: Windows 2000, XP.

Download at: Download.com

Another view: After a previous review of this application, several years ago, the following comment was made by a reader. To illustrate the conflicting views surrounding Memory Managers, I’ve copied that comment here.

XP and Vista have excellent memory management and there is no need or benefit in external memory “managers”. What problems there might be can not be corrected by any external program.

DLL’s are not unloaded from RAM when no longer needed – by design. Program code will not be unloaded when the application terminates – by design. This is what caching is all about. Caching has had a long and distinguished history and it is highly developed in XP, even better in Vista. When then RAM used by caching is needed for other purposes it will be released.

At all times Windows will attempt to find some use for as much memory as possible, even if it is only of trivial importance. Unused memory is wasted memory. If memory is needed for more important uses it will be made available. Until that times comes it will be left in use, improving overall system performance.

Bottom Line: Let Windows memory management do it’s job. It knows what it is doing, even when we do not understand.

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Filed under Computer Tools, downloads, Freeware, Memory Optimizers, Slow Computer, Software, System Memory Management, System Utilities, Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools, Windows XP

TuneUp Utilities 2010 – Is It Worth The Money?

Tuneup 3 Generally you can tweak the blazes out of your operating system; you just need to know where to go within the system to do so.

Maintaining an operating system to get that last ounce of performance is reasonably easy, but again – you need to know where to go within the system to do so.

But that’s the rub – you need to know where to go. This may be easy for a competent techie; but definitely not easy for a typical user.

In most cases, an average user does not have the skill set required to drill down through complex structures to get that “just so” look, feel, and performance from an operating system.

Not surprisingly, most typical users that I meet, run computers that under perform in virtually all areas. They could get so much more out of their system, if they only knew how.

Tweaking utility developers, along with system tool developers have long recognized that typical users need help in tweaking and maintaining their computers. As a consequence, the Internet is awash in both commercial and “free” applications that help users meet these challenges.

Regular readers here, are accustomed to reading software reviews that are based primarily on free, or open source applications, and occasionally a commercial application which may not have a competitor in the freeware marketplace. And that brings me to TuneUp Utilities 2010.

Tuneup 1

TuneUp Utilities 2010 is one of the very few commercial applications that I have, or would recommend. Despite the fact that I’m a huge fan of free software, there are times when only a commercial application will meet all of my needs in one interface.

Tuneup 2

System maintenance for maximum performance is a critical issue for me, (and it should be for you), and I simply don’t have the time to launch 6/7 freeware applications to do so. Don’t get me wrong, free applications are terrific, but every one I’ve ever tested has limitations of one type or another.

Here’s an example where a freeware application, of this type, would have fallen short – on my Win 7 machine, TuneUp Utilities pointed out 5 critical security issues I had overlooked. It embarrasses me to disclose that, but I’m still in the process of tuning my Win 7 machine. No excuse really, not when it comes to security, but…..

I’ve been using TuneUp Utilities since 2003, and I’ve come to rely on it to help me get the very best out of all my machines. Take a free test run on TuneUp Utilities 2010 for 30 days, and see if you don’t agree that this is one commercial application that offers excellent value.

Fast facts:

Start Center

* Maintain system

* Increase performance

* Fix problems

* Customize Windows

* Launch Turbo Mode

* Configure Live Optimization

TuneUp Gadget

* Displays your PC’s health directly on the Desktop

* Gives you direct access to key functions

* Runs under Windows Vista and Windows

1-Click Maintenance and Automatic Maintenance

* Fixes PC problems automatically with one click

* Improves the performance of programs and games

* Turns off unnecessary programs

* Reduces the time you spend maintaining your computer

* Cleans up your PC automatically in the background

Optimize system startup and shutdown

* Allows for a quicker startup and shut down of Windows

* Disable Windows services that make your computer slow

* Optimizes system and program settings

* Reduces the number of autostart programs that drain resources

Defragment hard disks

* Reduces program loading time

* Accelerates file opening and copying

* Lets programs and games run more smoothly

Defragment registry

* Repairs structural defects

* Reduces the size of the registry

* Improves overall system performance

Clean registry

* Reduces errors in Windows and programs

* Lists existing problems in detail

* Cleans the registry with only a few clicks

Turbo Mode

* Concentrates the entire performance of the PC on active programs

* Turns off unnecessary or processes specified by the user

* Provides a smoother working or gaming experience

Configure Live Optimization

* Manages resources efficiently

* Improves program response speed

* Accelerates program startup times

Configure system startup

* Shortens system startup

* Turns off startup programs

* Provides easy and clear explanations and recommendations

Display and uninstall programs

* Displays a list containing all installed programs

* Helps to search for programs no longer used

* Performs easy and clean uninstalls

Fix typical problems

* Recognizes and fixes the most frequent Windows problems

* Restores Desktop icons

* Fixes display errors

Restore deleted data

* Restores deleted files

* Finds deleted data with just a few clicks

* Also works with USB sticks and memory cards

Check hard drive for errors

* Finds errors on your hard disk

* Proposes actions to fix the errors

* Provides more security for your data

Manage running programs

* Precisely shows the processor capacity and memory utilization

* Provides complete control of the active programs

* Improves program management

Personalize Windows appearance

* Offers more design possibilities for windows and buttons

* Customizes the startup and log-on screens (XP™ and Vista™)

* Provides free download material for styles

Change Windows settings

* Neatly displays 400 different Windows settings

* Explains each setting clearly and understandably

* Reliably performs complicated optimization steps

I could go on here since there are additional important features that are included in this application but, I think you get the point. This program is overwhelmingly inclusive, and provides virtually every tool and applet, that a computer user is ever likely to need.

Is it worth $49.95 US for a 3 machine (many of us have more than one computer), license? In my view the answer is a definite – yes. TuneUp Utilities 2010 is simply the best application of its type that I have ever used.

System requirements: Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

Download a fully functional 30 day trial version at: TuneUp Utilities

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Filed under Computer Maintenance, Defraggers, Diagnostic Software, downloads, Geek Software and Tools, Hard Drive Maintenance, Registry Cleaners, Slow Computer, Software, Software Trial Versions, System Memory Management, System Tweaks, System Utilities, TuneUp Utilities, Windows 7, Windows Tips and Tools

Turn Off Unnecessary Services in XP – Speedup Your PC

windows_generic_v_web If you are a typical computer user, then the fewer services your system runs the better. The following will assist you in determining which services you can turn off in Windows XP Pro/Home, to improve performance, boot time, and to effectively increase your security level.

Every running, but unused, service on your machine may well be an unnecessary security vulnerability. If a service is not required for authorized users and system functionality, turn it off.

The following recommendations have been compiled from personal observation over the course of the last few years. The suggested settings may not be appropriate for your machine.

Before you begin, it is important to remember that if a particular service is disabled, any other service/services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start. Read the Properties information carefully and make sure you understand what the service does/does not do.

Adjusting services settings incorrectly has the potential to leave your computer in an unbootable condition. It’s important that before you begin making changes to system services, you have fully functional backups of your system/data.

If you are prepared to go ahead then open the Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Services. Right click on a service and open Properties to make changes to the startup type (first check the tab Dependencies).

Windows-XP-Services

Alerter (Disable) – Programs that use administrative rights will not receive them.

Application Layer Gateway Service (Enable) – If you’re reading this you’re on the Internet and you need this service to enable your firewall. You are running a firewall aren’t you? As well, this service is required for Internet Connection Sharing.

Application Management (Disable) – You won’t be able to install, use, or enumerate IntelliMirror programs.

Automatic Updates (Enable) – Automatic Updates will not function if disabled, which might put your operating system at risk. If you do turn off this service be sure to manually update at Microsoft’s Update site.

Background Intelligent Transfer Service (Enable) – Uses idle network bandwidth to transfer data between clients and servers in the background. Automatic Updates depends on this service.

ClipBook Viewer (Disable) – If the service is stopped, ClipBook Viewer will not be able to share information with remote computers.

COM+ Event System/System Application (Enable) – System Event Notification, which includes logon and logoff notifications, will not function if disabled.

Computer Browser (Enable) – Used by the system in order to view network domains and resources and locate other computers on the network. Since many of us now share files, leave this service enabled.

Cryptographic Services (Enable) – This service is used by Automatic Updates, Task Manager, and several other services.

DHCP Client (Enable) – Without this service being started your system will be unable to obtain an IP address from a DHCP server, and will have to be configured manually to a static address.

Distributed Link Tracking Client (Disable) – Link tracking on your computer will not function; users on other computers will be unable to track links on your machine.

Distributed Transaction Coordinator (Disable) – Provides support for transactions that span multiple resource managers, such as databases, message queues, and file systems. Generally not required.

DNS Client (Enable) – Resolves and caches Domain Name System (DNS) names for your computer. If this service is stopped, your computer will not be able to resolve DNS names and locate Active Directory domain controllers.

Error Reporting Service (Disable) – Reports unexpected application crashes to Microsoft.

Event Log (Enable) – With this service turned off you will be unable to view your logs; this will make it potentially more difficult to diagnose problems and to detect security breaches.

Fast User Switching Compatibility (Disable) – Fast user switching will not be available.

Help and Support (Enable) – Occasionally you may need this service, so keep it enabled.

HID Input (Enable if Required) – This service allows access to Human Interface Devices which control predefined hot buttons on newer keyboards, remote controls, and so on. If you don’t require this, you can safely turn it off.

IMAPI CD-Burning COM Service (Enable) – Most computers have at least a CD drive and if yours does, then leave this service enabled, otherwise you will be unable to record CDs.

Indexing Service (Disable) – With this service turned off, your computer will be unable to index files. On the plus side, your machine will likely boot faster with this service disabled.

Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) / Internet Connection Sharing (Disable) – Unless you have a home network set-up, there is no need to enable this service.

IPSEC Service (Disable) – TCP/IP security will be disabled on your network. This does not refer to the Internet.

Logical Disk Manager (Disable) – Unless you are adding new disks to the system, there is no need to keep this service enabled.

Logical Disk Manager Administrative (Disable) – If you have enabled Logical Disk Manager then this service must be enabled.

Machine Debug Manager (Disable) – Unless you are involved in Visual Studio debugging disable this service.

Messenger (Disable) – Transmits net send and Alerter service messages between clients and servers. This service is not related to Windows Messenger.

Microsoft Software Shadow Copy Provider (Disable or Manual) – If you use Windows Backup set this at manual; otherwise set at disable.

NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing (Disable) – If you don’t use NetMeeting then disable this service.

Network Connections (Enable) – Services that need network information will not be available if this service is disabled.

Network DDE (Disable) – Dynamic Data Exchange transport and security will be unavailable.

Network Location Awareness (Enable) – Network configuration and location information is handled by this service and must be enabled if you have an Internet connection.

Net Logon (Disable) – This service supports pass-through authentication of account logon events for computers in a domain.

NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing (Disable) – The service enables an authorized user to access your computer remotely by using NetMeeting over a corporate intranet. Unless you specifically require this service, turn it off.

Performance Logs and Alerts (Disable) – Collects performance data from local or remote computers based on preconfigured schedule parameters, then writes the data to a log or triggers an alert. If this service is stopped, performance information will not be collected. Personally, I prefer to enable this service.

Plug and Play (Enable) – You run the risk of the system becoming unstable if you disable this service.

Portable Media Serial Number (Enable) – With the proliferation of these types of devices, enable this service. If however, you do not attach such devices to your machine, you can safely disable this service.

Print Spooler (Enable) – If you disable this service you will be unable to run a printer.

Protected Storage (Enable) – Provides protected storage for sensitive data, such as private keys, to prevent access by unauthorized services, processes, or users.

QoS RSVP (Disable) – Enable this service only if you use QoS programs.

Remote Access Auto Connection Manager (Enable) – Creates a connection to a remote network whenever a program references a remote DNS or NetBIOS name or address.

Remote Access Connection Manager (Enable) – This service creates a network connection.

Remote Desktop Help Session Manager (Disable) – Unless you require this function keep this service disabled.

Remote Procedure Call (Enable) – This service must be enabled or the system will not boot.

Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator (Enable) – Manages the RPC name service database, which is similar to DNS services for IP.

Remote Registry (Disable) – Enables remote users to modify registry settings on this computer. Be sure to disable this service unless it is absolutely required.

Removable Storage (Enable) – Manages removable media including automated removable media devices.

Secondary Logon (Disable) – Enables starting processes under alternate credentials.

Security Accounts Manager (Enable) – If you don’t use DHCP to obtain an IP address you can disable this service.

Server (Disable) – Unless you share files or local resources, be sure to disable this service.

Shell Hardware Detection (Enable) – Unless this service is enabled CD-ROMs and other devices will not function automatically.

Smart Card (Enable) – Allows your machine to read a smart card. On the other hand, if your machine does not have a reader you can disable this service.

Smart Card Helper (Enable) – Provides support for legacy (older) smart cards.

SSDP Discovery (Disable) – This service has long been recognized as a security issue and should be disabled, unless you have a home network, in which case you should enable.

System Event Notification (Disable) – Tracks system events such as Windows logon, network, and power events. Notifies COM+ Event System subscribers of these events. If your system is on a laptop, leave this service enabled so that power notifications are available.

System Restore Service (Enable) – Without this service enable you will be unable to create a restore point, or restore your system to an earlier point.

Task Scheduler (Disable) – Keep disabled unless you run scheduled tasks.

TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper (Disable) – On desktop systems disable this service.

Telephony (Disable) – Enable this service if you have a modem/fax modem.

Telnet (Disable) – Unless you allow remote access to your programs, disable this service.

Terminal Services (Enable) – See the disable method below.

Allows multiple users to be connected interactively to a machine as well as the display of desktops and applications to remote computers. Rather than disabling this service, instead clear the check boxes in the remote tab on the System Properties Control panel.

Themes (Disable) – Keep in mind, that if you disable this service you will no longer be able to manage Themes.

Uninterruptible Power Supply (Disable) – Manages an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) connected to the computer. Of course, if you have an uninterruptible power supply this must be enabled.

Universal plug and Play Device Host (Disable) – Not needed on standalone systems.

Upload Manager (Disable) – Manages synchronous and asynchronous file transfers between clients and servers on the network. If you use an FTP application enable this service.

Volume Shadow Copy (Enable) – You can disable this service if you do not use Windows Backup.

Web Client (Enable) – Enables Windows-based programs to create, access, and modify Internet-based files. If you do not require this function, then disable this service.

Windows Audio (Enable) – Manages audio devices for Windows-based programs. If this service is stopped, audio devices and effects will not function properly.

Windows Image Acquisition (Enable) – Provides image acquisition services for scanners and cameras.

Windows Installer (Enable) – Installs, repairs and removes software according to instructions contained in .MSI files.

Windows Management Instrumentation (Enable) – Provides a common interface and object model to access management information about operating system, devices, applications and services. If this service is stopped, most Windows-based software will not function properly.

Windows Management Instrumentation Driver Extensions (Enable) – Provides systems management information to and from drivers.

Windows Time (Disable) – Maintains date and time synchronization on all clients and servers in the network.

Wireless Zero Configuration (Disable) – Enable if you are using a wireless network.

WMI Performance Adaptor (Enable) – Provides performance library information from WMI providers.

Workstation (Disable) – Creates and maintains client network connections using the Microsoft Network Services. If this service is disabled, these connections will be unavailable.

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Filed under System Memory Management, System Security, System Tweaks, Windows Tips and Tools

Low Memory Problem? – Fix it With FreeRam XP Pro (Free)

Is your computer always “just poking along”? Do you know which of your running programs are RAM hogs? Do you still have DLL’s running in the background when they’re no longer needed, and they seem to take forever to unload?

Unfortunately, in many cases, Windows fails to correctly unload programs and DLL’s from memory (RAM) on program exit. So less memory is available for new programs; this can cause excessive system slowdown, or in some cases system crashes.

FreeRAM XP Pro will free up and optimize memory, allowing your computer to perform to its optimum level.

Yes, I’ve heard all the naysayers and their arguments that memory management and optimization applications, are not effective. Balderdash! Sure, if you have 2/3/4, GB of Ram you don’t need to manage your memory in this way.

However, the majority of users that I deal with on a personal level, run Windows XP on a two year old box, with 256/512 MB of RAM – they do not run Windows Vista with 2/3/4 GB of Ram. This is “real world” computing, not the “esoteric world” of computing that many techies live in, where the assumption seems to be, all users run a quad core with appropriate memory. It just ain’t so!

This free utility includes automatic memory monitoring and optimization, advanced tray support, fast, threaded freeing with a stop option, multiple system-metric monitors, a simple and attractive GUI, memory reporting and diagnostic logging, and real-time memory information.

The program’s AutoFree feature intelligently scales how much RAM is freed with your current system status, so that RAM is optimized without slowing down your computer.

FreeRAM XP Pro has been designed to be easy to use, yet highly customizable by computer novices and experts alike.

One of my test platforms is an older Dell running Windows XP with 512 MB of RAM, which gets a heavy workout on a daily basis, and has for years. FreeRAM XP Pro has been an integral part of this system for most of that time, and has worked flawlessly in balancing and releasing memory as required.

Fast facts:

Downloaded almost 6 million times from CNET alone

Automatic, real-time memory monitoring and optimization

Fast, threaded memory freeing with stop option

AutoFree option intelligently optimizes RAM without sacrificing performance

System metric and performance monitors

Advanced tray support

Memory reporting and diagnostic logging

Simple, attractive interface

RAM-cuts (RAM-freeing Windows shortcuts)

Customizable Windows hotkey support

Access to Windows memory-related tweaks that could enhance system performance

Process memory usage reporting

Unique memory compression technology directly reduces applications’ “working set” memory requirements instantly and without swap file usage: completely unlike other memory programs

Requirements: Windows 95/98/Me/2000/XP/2003 Server

Download at: Download.com

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Filed under Freeware, Geek Software and Tools, Memory Optimizers, Slow Computer, Software, System Memory Management, System Tweaks, System Utilities, Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools

Advanced WindowsCare Personal – Great Free System Optimizer

Advanced WindowsCare Personal, a free all-in-one utility, is a terrific collection of system tools and utilities to fix, speed up, maintain and protect your PC. Having tested this application, over the last year or so, I’m convinced that a typical user can really benefit by having this application on their system.

With this free program you can tweak, repair, optimize and improve your system’s performance; and its ease of operation makes it ideal for less experienced users.

You can quickly find the tool you’re looking for: spyware scanner, adware blocker, tracks eraser, registry cleaner, startup manager, junk file cleaner and more. New, or inexperienced users, will love the one click system optimizer which analyzes system configuration and suggests changes to optimize performance. Before making any system changes, Advanced WindowsCare Personal, creates a backup copy first, a very important feature.

Key facts:

Spyware removal – scans and removes spyware and adware.

Security defense – prevents spyware from being installed.

Registry cleaner – scans and cleans your registry to improve your system’s performance. System optimization – optimizes and repairs system configuration

Startup manager – manages programs which run automatically on startup

Privacy sweep – erases all traces, evidence, cookies, internet history and more.

Junk file cleanup – removes junk data from your disks and recovers disk space.

Memory cleaner – monitors and optimizes free memory in the background.

Disk manger – provides detailed information on files and folders

If you need a one click collection of system tools and utilities to help you keep your computer in tip top shape, Advanced WindowsCare Personal should meet your needs and more.

System Requirements: Windows 2000/ XP/ Vista

Download at: Download.com

Glary Utilities is another free all-in-one utility, to fix, speed up, maintain and protect your PC that offers additional feature. Check it out on this site at “Glary Utilities – Perfect Collection of Free System Tools”.

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Filed under Cleaning Your Computer, Freeware, Memory Optimizers, Privacy, Registry Cleaners, Slow Computer, Software, Spyware - Adware Protection, System Memory Management, System Tweaks, System Utilities, Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools

Pristy Utilities 2009 – Simple PC Tools

Very often new and casual computer users get left behind when it comes to PC utility software.

Developers of this type of applications are prone to designing tools that require more than just a passing knowledge of how computer operating systems really work.

For many users, a simple set of tools that does not require the user to be geek inclined are more appropriate than a suite of tools that does everything but clean the kitchen sink.

Pristy Utilities 2009 is a somewhat low end, but simple set of tools for new and casual computer users that includes the following fairly basic modules:

System Power Down scheduler – A fully customizable scheduler that allows the user to schedule Power down, Reboot, Sleep, Log off, Locking the desktop, etc. Includes timer presets with custom options.

PC Detector – Displays essentially the same information as Windows Device Manager but in a manner that is more new user friendly.

Web Assistant – I found this module particularly appealing since it allows a quick one click approach to multi-tab web browsing with integrated search engines including Web Search, News, and Services. Additional functions include transmitting emails and files over the Internet.

Additional modules include:

System Memory Cleaner – There are better, and more functional, free stand alone memory utilities but in a pinch this can do the job.

File Wipeout – An elementary file eraser; nothing special here.

Desktop Clock – A floating clock applet that additionally provides, date and CPU speed stats.

Vista Booster – Allows the optimization of Vista settings, CPU L2 setup, boot defrag, fonts repair and install.

Toolbar and Tray Agent – Gives instant access to all application modules.

System Requirements: Windows XP, 2000, 98, Me, NT

Download at: Download.com

For a more robust set of system utilities checkout Glary Utilities – Perfect Collection of Free System Tools on this site.

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Filed under Freeware, Interconnectivity, Memory Optimizers, Secure File Deletion, Software, System Memory Management, System Utilities, Tracks Eraser, Utilities, Windows Tips and Tools