NetSpeedMonitor – A Double Duty Network Monitoring Tool

https://i1.wp.com/technabob.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/02/usb_typing_wpm_speedometer.jpgRegular readers here will remember, that I’m an advocate of utilities which provide users with the capability to double check which of their applications are connecting to the Internet – including the capability to monitor open ports and Internet connections.

CurrPorts is my tool of choice, since it allows me to view a list of ports that are currently in use, and the application (keep in mind, that malware, for all practical purposes – is an application) that is using those ports.

Recently, I came across a neat little application (free – but donations are encouraged), which duplicates some of the features of CurrPorts but in addition, includes a number of secondary capabilities which should be of interest to those users who need to monitor their data consumption on a session, daily, or monthly basis.

Directly after installation, NetSpeedMonitor sits in the system tray and displays data on current upload/download speeds – as shown in the following screen capture.

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Hovering over the the NetSpeedMonitor icon generates addition data – Month/Day/Session.

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Better yet, right clicking on the icon allows a user access to supplementary data from an expandable fly-out menu.

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In the following example, I’ve selected “Network Connections” and its submenu, for illustrative purposes.

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Again, from the fly-out menu, I’ve selected “Connections” and……..

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…. the data displayed includes – TCP and UDP connections (established, listening, or closed), remote address, process ID for each connection, and the application/s using the connection/s.

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Overall assessment – a cool little application that generates data which should prove valuable for those users who have a need to keep an eye on data caps or, users who have a need to monitor ports and connections.

System requirements: Windows XP, Server 2003, Vista, Win 7 (with a little finagling I ran the application on Win 8).

Languages: NetSpeedMonitor is available in multiple languages including, English, German, Spanish, Italian, and Russian.

Download at: Developer’s site.

14 Comments

Filed under downloads, Freeware, Network Tools, Windows Tips and Tools

14 responses to “NetSpeedMonitor – A Double Duty Network Monitoring Tool

  1. johnmw1

    Hi Bill,
    Looks like another interesting app to take for a spin. Having just changed ISP provider I’m now very interested in such things as this to see if I’m getting what I have payed for.

    I see your still running with MW Snap.

    Cheers,
    John

    • Hi John,

      That sounds like a perfect way to test this app and, you’re right to do so. We don’t always get what we pay for.

      Yeah, good old MW Snap has served me well all these years. What surprises me is – it works as well on Win 8 as it did on Win 98. Go figure. 🙂

      Best,

      Bill

  2. I’d mentioned in a comment on another post that I’m in the habit of keeping my LAN or wifi turned off when I don’t need to be on the internet. An application similar to this was the reason I started doing that.

    That application showed me, much to my consternation, quite a bit of network activity at times when I wasn’t even browsing. It wasn’t even due to malware, quite a few legitimate applications (one’s you’ve actually chosen to install, and want to keep and use) feel it’s their god-given right to communicate incessantly with their servers. While I could understand if that was for program updates, when I turned update checks off some of them still connected to their servers. This was the case even with some free software or software where the licence had already been confirmed as valid through an online check, so I was left wondering what information was being sent, and why.

    A number of my habits changed as a result of this information, including finding alternatives to some programs (They were replaced with ones that didn’t feed who knows what info back to their servers).

  3. Mal

    Hi Bill and RNH,
    I practice the same thing, the internet connection is turned off if I am not going to use it for an extended time. It irritates me too when apps are phoning home for no good reason, which is why only essential programs are allowed to connect automatically through my firewall. That way, I can keep an eye on what is trying to connect out.
    Cheers

    • Hey May,

      As a ZoneAlarm user, for you, turning off the connection is one click simple. Even so, I suspect that most ZA users don’t engage with this. Why not, is beyond me.

      I listened to your “irritation”, now you get to hear mine. 🙂

      So many apps (during installation) want to connect to the Net through a Firewall request. Despite my constant “NO” at the Firewall query – most of these apps override the Firewall and connect to the Net anyway. In most cases there is no discernible reason for doing so. Now, that bugs me. 🙂

      Good advice in your comment, BTW.

      Best,

      Bill

  4. John Bent

    Hi Bill,

    As I’ve mentioned before, my Acer laptop has a switch on the side to disconnect/connect instantly. Such a good idea, I don’t understand why all manufacturers don’t do it. Particularly useful now I’ve swapped ZoneAlarm for PCTools Firewall Plus.

    Kind regards
    John

  5. Mal

    Hey Bill,
    The last part of your comment has me intrigued – “Despite my constant “NO” at the Firewall query – most of these apps override the Firewall and connect to the Net anyway”.
    If I click “No” on a firewall request, and press the “Remember” button, that app stays blocked. I am just wondering how an app can override a Firewall. I’ve heard of it happening, but I’ve never experienced it.
    Cheers

    • Hey Mal,

      Just to be clear – I’m referring to an app which opens a web page as it’s being installed. In some cases, this might mean a “help” page, or a FAQ page – but, not often. Instead, when I see this, there is no good reason for the connection.

      I’m not usually interested so I give the Firewall a “NO”. Doesn’t seem to matter since the page opens anyway. Or, often when uninstalling an app – the same sort of thing happens. A page opens “sorry to see you go” sort of thing – despite blocking the request through the Firewall.

      As to how this happens? Since the app is already on the system the process of overriding the Firewall is easy enough. A hack by any other name.

      Best,

      Bill

      • Mal

        Hey Bill,
        Gotcha, now I understand.
        Actually, I have my Threatfire sensitivity level set at 4, so when apps try to open a browser, Threatfire alerts me, with the option to kill the process trying to open the browser. Good old Threatfire, hard at work.
        Cheers

        • Hey Mal,

          A perfect solution!

          In the latest Win 8 release (Release Preview), Threatfire, which worked perfectly in all previous pre-releases, no longer works. This is a major setback for those of us who, with good reason, relied on Threatfire as a major piece of the “wall”. And, with Threatfire’s uneven history of updating the appliction who knows if this will change.

          Best,

          Bill

  6. Mark Schneider

    Bill,
    Thanks for another great tip and tool! I need more info on what’s happening with my connection since I managed to get a bit of a nasty on my computer recently. Thanks to Combo Fix I managed to get it off but I was getting close to doing a nuke and pave.
    Hope your summer is going well.
    Mark

    • Hi Mark,

      Happy to hear you pulled off another super rescue job. Well done!

      An unusually warm Spring here – so, Summer is shaping up nicely.

      Best,

      Bill