Tech Thoughts Daily Net News – December 13, 2009

Cloud Hacking Service Steals Wi-Fi Passwords in 20 Minutes – For $34, a new cloud-based hacking service can crack a WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) network password in just 20 minutes. If WPA Cracker customers find the $34 price tag too steep, they can use half the cluster and pay $17, for what could be a 40-minute job.

McAfee Total Care Fixes Your PC Remotely – Computer problems caused by malware can sometimes be too tricky to fix on your own. But you don’t have to drag your PC to an in-store technician. McAfee’s new Total Care services connect you with experts who can fix your PC without your having to leave the house.

Tech Thoughts Daily Tech News 2

Watch what’s new in Thunderbird 3 – Thunderbird 3 is finally here for Windows, Mac, and Linux, after a gestation period measured in years. Take an introductory tour in this First Look video of the latest improvements, including robust integrated search, tabbed e-mail reading, and a slick new account wizard.

How to Buy a Digital Photo Frame Follow our five simple rules to find a frame that delivers sharp images and great features at a pleasing price.

Lifehacker: Most Popular Photography Hacks of 2009 – Whether making your own lens hood, breathing like a sniper to get a blur-free photo, or angling your body to look the best in pictures, we shared some great photography hacks this year.

Dangers on the web – Planning to avoid the H1N1 virus by staying out of the shops and trading online? Be sure you’re not exchanging one kind of infection for another, warns a video produced by Comodo. Malls are full of dirty door knobs and coughing strangers, but the Internet has its own dangers—clever programmers intent on separating visitors from their money.

I’ve got 668 ‘friends’ on Facebook… but I don’t know any of my neighbors – As I sit down with a cup of coffee to check my emails, my gaze shifts out of the window, where I notice a bald chap wheezing over a wheelbarrow two gardens away. I think he’s my neighbour – but I’m not sure.

Google Zipping Ahead With Real-Time Search – Google’s already talked up its integration of real-time results — read: Twitter — into its search engine. Now it’s making good on that pledge, and extending the benefits to its enterprise offering, according to a Datamation report.

Off Topic:

Patenting melon juice? Not if India gets its way – Fed up with foreign companies patenting traditional medicine from India, the country’s top scientific body is compiling a giant database of everything from yoga positions to medicinal fruit juice. The initiative has had early success since going public in February, repelling two foreign patent applications in July – one for a skin cream based on melon extract and another for a cancer medicine based on pistachios. (Submitted by Dar)

Top 10 Homemade Versions of Things We Love – Making your own versions of great food and clever gadgets is already rewarding, and if you play your cards right, the homemade route also comes with serious bragging rights. These 10 economical homemade creations—epicurean and electrical—should inspire some well-deserved praise.

Rudolph, the Red-Nippled Reindeer – I was walking through NYC today, and noticed an invasion of people dressed as Santa Claus. At least a hundred. I don’t know what they were up to, but none of their costumes were as good as the Red-Nippled Reindeer.

Ten Most Optimistic Car Names Of All Time – There are laws preventing automakers from making outrageous and false promises about their vehicles — but these laws don’t apply to car names.

Today’s Quote:

“Two paradoxes are better than one; they may even suggest a solution”.

–     Edward Teller

Today’s Free Downloads:

Avast Home Edition: Free Antivirus – This impressive software provides the same steadfast protection of well-known antivirus programs, yet it’s surprisingly free.

Foxit Reader – To put it gently, Adobe Reader is a real pain in the hindquarters. It’s monstrously large, slow to load, and includes many features most users will hardly ever need. Foxit PDF Reader 3.0 kills the bloat and throws in some useful features, such as multimedia support and content-sharing options, while still allowing you to quickly access your PDFs.

Smart Defrag 1.30 – It’s hard to stand out in the crowded field of defraggers, but SmartDefrag is able to do so with an unexpected twist. Along with quick analysis and scans, SmartDefrag boasts an automated defragger that continually defrags the files that you use the most, and does it without becoming a persistent drag on your system resources. When running in the background, the program only eats up 14MB of RAM, so it’s possible to run it smoothly on older machines.

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5 Comments

Filed under Internet Security Alerts, Tech Net News

5 responses to “Tech Thoughts Daily Net News – December 13, 2009

  1. Pingback: Kpacu » Blog Archive » Tech Thoughts Daily Net News – December 13, 2009 « Bill Mullins …

  2. ‘Patenting melon juice? Not if India gets its way – Fed up with foreign companies patenting traditional medicine from India, the country’s top scientific body is compiling a giant database of everything from yoga positions to medicinal fruit juice. The initiative has had early success since going public in February, repelling two foreign patent applications in July – one for a skin cream based on melon extract and another for a cancer medicine based on pistachios. (Submitted by Dar)’

    Reminded me of a Japanese who wanted to patent a Philippine plant or fruit Bill lol

  3. In reference to McAfee’s Total Care service, I’m finding customers are beginning to demand this type of remote support. We’ve been providing this service to our clients for almost 2 years now, and they love it! They don’t have to disconnect all their cables and drag their computer to our shop or pay the high onsite prices, and usually only the worst of issues can’t be solved using this method, as long as internet access is functioning we can go in and do our thing.

    • Bill Mullins

      Hey Dave,

      Your comment really does show the value of remote support.

      I’ve often wondered about the value of local (in my town), remote support, versus that offered by the “big name” vendors. Maybe I’m biased, since I’m big into dealing with local businesses, but I have a suspicion that dealing locally for this type of service, has advantages over dealing with the “far away”, “big name” vendors.

      Great to hear from you.

      Bill